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Ditching the Tire Shops, At Home Install


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I'm thinking about removing and installing tires on steel wheels here at home. HF manual tire changer, HF bubble balance, clip-on spring weights. Is the tire lever powder coated as to not scratch steel wheels?

Is there an issue with a small shop compressor (like for a portable nailing gun) setting beads? Do I really want tons of volume quickly, necessitating pro equipment? I realize that I'll remove the valve from the stem and use a safety-nozzle for max volume. I'm not interested in a flammable technique.

How will I know which side of the wheel to place weights, axle side or hub cap side? Or, is the inside of the wheel for when the front gets kinda weighty?

Do I even need to balance? I lost a small to medium weight installed by a pro shop on my 215/75R15 on my FJ40 with factory steelies, and I would never have known by driving it. I'll also be mounting 195/75R14 for my other ride, so these aren't what you might think of as truck tires. Is there a tool needed for weight installation and removal?

Do I need dried compressed air, or can it be just New Mexico on a dry day?

There has to be a preferable soap, and its ideal concentration? I'm thinking about corrosion, and compatibility with the tire, valve stem, patches, etc. My guess is that I'm probably overthinking this one.
 
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41 minutes ago, DIY 1985 said:
I'm thinking about removing and installing tires on steel wheels here at home. HF manual tire changer, HF bubble balance, clip-on spring weights. Is the tire lever powder coated as to not scratch steel wheels?

Is there an issue with a small shop compressor (like for a portable nailing gun) setting beads? Do I really want tons of volume quickly, necessitating pro equipment? I realize that I'll remove the valve from the stem and use a safety-nozzle for max volume. I'm not interested in a flammable technique.

How will I know which side of the wheel to place weights, axle side or hub cap side? Or, is the inside of the wheel for when the front gets kinda weighty?

Do I even need to balance? I lost a small to medium weight installed by a pro shop on my 215/75R15 on my FJ40 with factory steelies, and I would never have known by driving it. I'll also be mounting 195/75R14 for my other ride, so these aren't what you might think of as truck tires. Is there a tool needed for weight installation and removal?

Do I need dried compressed air, or can it be just New Mexico on a dry day?

There has to be a preferable soap, and its ideal concentration? I'm thinking about corrosion, and compatibility with the tire, valve stem, patches, etc. My guess is that I'm probably overthinking this one.
 

 

Volume is king when trying to seat beads. There are tools available that have a reservoir and a quick release valve to give a blast of air to force the tire beads to the seats long enough for the air coming in the stem to fill the void and keep the beads seated. So yoou could make do with the nailgun compressor. 

 

Be prepared to wait while filling tires.

 

It is always good to have a water separator on the compressor outlet, and keep it and the compressor tank empty of water accumulation, but beyond that the air form your small unit should be OK.

 

The local shop equipment supply house that sells tire changing equipment and consumables should have tire soap Some people just mix up dishwashing soap (not the kind that goes in the dishwasher) or even use it straight. Just wash the tire and wheel after mounting.

 

I would try splitting the weight between the inside and outside and see what results that gives.

Edited by Racer X 69
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Speedway 30 Inch Tire Spoon Tool

 

I've changed 3 or 4 sets of tires by hand with only a tire lever. Only ones I had done at a shop were the new ones put on my 620.

 

Take the valve out of the stem to get the air out. Put large plank on the rubber and drive family car up the board till it pops off the bead.

 

Detergent and water in a Windex bottle.

 

When blowing the tire onto the bead, remove the valve, stand upright and lean over and on it pushing down with your body. Usually goes on this way. If not, while blowing in air pick wheel up and slam down on tread. This causes the rubber to swell outward and all you need is contact for a split second.

 

Always replace the valve stem.

 

 

 

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I like the plank idea, but, I also saw someone do it with a high-lift jack and the weight of the truck, on Youtube.  

 

The HF unit with the center spindle might be easier to lever off of - 40 USA dollars (ish), and it comes with the bar.  However, it would be nice to have about two or three of Mike's tire irons / spoons just to hold the tire in position against the rim?

 

@john510It seems like the nail gun compressor has the volume, and pressure, just not the volume delivery thru the blow-gun with rubber safety tip, or am I wrong?

 

 

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The spoons are to pry the tire on and off the rim. Two would be better but I only have one. I also have a  15" Mac screwdriver. Can't see how you could hold the tire in position against the rim.

 

I don't have one but a ratchet strap wrapped around the tread and tightened would also force the tire sides out against the bead.

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Got a gallon of RuGlyde from NAPA - no way I'm using all of that in my life, but, whatever.

 

I must have used an hour or more to just determine how to mount the tire changer without concrete anchors.  I figured that I would use my HF engine crane base.  I ran to the hardware store to get some 3/8" eye-bolts, they are held by the eye of the outside leg hitch pin.  I thought that I was going to weld pipes in for U-bolts, but it wasn't necessary.

 

20210713_184107.thumb.jpg.9148c695eac73f592ab76d9ad496a680.jpg\\\

 

So, I was able to remove my 720 spare from a good wheel (gonna paint it), to a junkyard wheel that has minor blow-out damage (wish I would have known that before I bought it, oh, well, I made an extra 150 miles for another wheel and harvested a spare/trail starter too).  The whole tire mounting process was super easy.  The directions didn't mention removing the spring weights before starting, oops, lost some paint on that one.  Now, on to tire shopping, finding plugs for the inside and figuring out balancing.  I'm thinking Hankook Kinergy ST 195/75R14, harvesting a bunch of steel-rim weights from the local scrap yard, and fabbing a tool for weight removal.  If I get a machine shop to make an aluminum insert for the Toyota 15" Land Cruiser wheels, I might get away with a bubble balance for both rigs.

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On 7/11/2021 at 8:11 PM, datzenmike said:

Wouldn't try that on a good tire.

Why not, used to do my own tire mounting for my race car with 10 inch slick racing tires, never had any problems, using the same tools as in the video

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