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1200 brake upgrade mklotz70


mklotz70

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Morrisun is waaaaaay more qualified to answer the 1200 questions than I am. He was the mastermind behind this upgrade. He told me what he wanted to do and we figured it out from there. Sorry I can't be more help on this kind of question. I can tell you that the bigger m/c will shorted your pedal throw and make it a bit harder to push, but I have no clue about specifics on the 1200.

 

Thanks Morrisun!!!! :)

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The brake bias, using stock rear wheel cylinders, seems to do the job on the street very well. Jumping 3/16" in master cylinder bore will take a bit more pedal pressure, and it MAY affect the brake bias.

 

The main reason I believe I must step up in master cylinder at least one size is that my car has 280ZX disc brakes on the rear. So I'll be running the same size discs all around with a 48mm piston up front and a 38mm piston in the rear (same design caliper, looks almost identical, just smaller).

 

Will probably also be using an adjustable proportioning valve to dial it in better.

 

Let us know how it works out, most who have tried the brake kit run A series engines, if you are planning on running heavier engine, it may be a consideration, perhaps a brake booster??

 

I'll be running a Z20/5spd so a booster may be in order. Not feeling good about having enough room for it though. Could foul the carbs. We shall see...

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Not widely accepted in the Datsun engine swap world, but you may consider a remote booster/master cylinder,

IIbrakeremote.jpg

This one is used in Ford V8 powered Sunbeam Tiger. Adding an extra 150+ lbs of engine weight over the stock A12 will change the braking characteristics/bias, an adjustable proportioning valve is a good idea.

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Not widely accepted in the Datsun engine swap world, but you may consider a remote booster/master cylinder,

This one is used in Ford V8 powered Sunbeam Tiger.

 

Interesting idea, but not for me. ^_^

 

Adding an extra 150+ lbs of engine weight over the stock A12 will change the braking characteristics/bias, an adjustable proportioning valve is a good idea.

 

Will definitely have a proportioning valve. :thumbup:

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Do tell, which calipers and mods? Do they have larger pistons, if so it will need a proportioning valve.

 

In the datsun1200 guide it gives years, part numbers and photos for the ones Doug used

 

 

 

Yeah, but the year range wasn't 100% correct and/or all-inclusive. I ordered '88 Sentra calipers, and apparently the 88-89 had two different style calipers. One is like the ones Doug used, the other (mine) has a the same "caliper" just with a much beefier mounting bracket. 

 

And as far as proportioning valves go, that was a given from the start. Already planning to plumb in a Wilwood adjustable proportioning valve since I have 280ZX rear disc brakes on the back.

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I used a 280ZX master, and other than a slight increase in pedal effort, it works great. Bias is perfect, no problems. If anyone wants a remote booster, I have the one I took off my 1200, and would sell it. I lost all the pics of my brake and suspension install, so I will retake and post when I get time.

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Master Cylinder choice does not affect brake bias, just to be clear. This setup inherently has a nice balance (ratio between front and rear brakes).

 

 

> I ordered '88 Sentra calipers, and apparently the 88-89 had two different style calipers.

 

Yes, there are two 1988-1989 calipers. Here's what the Guide says:

* CA <-- Not this

41001-02Y00 0887-0989 CA18D

41001-58A01 0986-0887 CA16D

* This

41001-05A90 GA15, E16

 

The calipers are from:

•1982-1990 Nissan B11/B12 (Sentra/Sunny)

•1983-1990 Nissan Pulsar N12/N13

 

RockAuto (1990 Pulsar NX SOHC Type)

•BECK/ARNLEY 0770371S Left

•BECK/ARNLEY 0770372S Right

•Centric 14142048 Left

•Centric 14242047 Right

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks for the video Mike. No worries here, I'll just watch the pads closely, I am picky about safety stuff anyway. I'll probably trim the tie rod end stud and just leave one thread exposed for the lock nut..

 

 

---Craig

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Thanks for the video Mike. No worries here, I'll just watch the pads closely, I am picky about safety stuff anyway. I'll probably trim the tie rod end stud and just leave one thread exposed for the lock nut..

 

I think it's a way easier fix (as he mentions) to just swap the struts side to side. Then there's no chance of a clearance issue.

 

And assuming I'm "the other guy" mentioned in the video, to assuage any fears the brake line does easily reroute to the other side of the strut. Zero issues there.  :thumbup:

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Thanks for the video Mike. No worries here, I'll just watch the pads closely, I am picky about safety stuff anyway. I'll probably trim the tie rod end stud and just leave one thread exposed for the lock nut..

 

 

---Craig

 

I think that would be a really fast, easy way to make sure there's never any clearance issue.

 

I think it's a way easier fix (as he mentions) to just swap the struts side to side. Then there's no chance of a clearance issue.

 

And assuming I'm "the other guy" mentioned in the video, to assuage any fears the brake line does easily reroute to the other side of the strut. Zero issues there.  :thumbup:

 

Swapping the stuts is an awesome way to gain the clearance(maybe not the easiest for most guys) and that's great to know that the brake line still reaches! 

 

It would seem to me that having the calipers on the front side of the rotors would also help cut down on nose dive and the rearend getting lighter.......but that's just my guess/observation. 

 

I will probably look into clocking the caliper a bit more when I need more brackets cut.  I wonder if I could slot one of the caliper holes and make it fit both calipers?  Did you take any pics of how you had to clearance the holes to fit yours? 

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I wonder if I could slot one of the caliper holes and make it fit both calipers?  Did you take any pics of how you had to clearance the holes to fit yours? '

 

FYI, I didn't modify your bracket, I modified the caliper.   ;)

 

I'll get some pics this weekend.  :thumbup:

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Master Cylinder choice does not affect brake bias, just to be clear. This setup inherently has a nice balance (ratio between front and rear brakes).

 

 

> I ordered '88 Sentra calipers, and apparently the 88-89 had two different style calipers.

 

Yes, there are two 1988-1989 calipers. Here's what the Guide says:

* CA <-- Not this

41001-02Y00 0887-0989 CA18D

41001-58A01 0986-0887 CA16D

* This

41001-05A90 GA15, E16

 

The calipers are from:

•1982-1990 Nissan B11/B12 (Sentra/Sunny)

•1983-1990 Nissan Pulsar N12/N13

 

RockAuto (1990 Pulsar NX SOHC Type)

•BECK/ARNLEY 0770371S Left

•BECK/ARNLEY 0770372S Right

•Centric 14142048 Left

•Centric 14242047 Right

Note: The *Centric 14242047 Right should be *Centric 14142047 Right The "2" denotes "loaded", the "1" denotes "semi-loaded".

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  • 2 weeks later...

I just read somewhere that the optimum position (clock) is at the nine o clock so maybe the strut swap is the better choice. I think I will swap mine when I drop them for the perch collars in the next few weeks. I will post some findings at that time. Thanks for the video. Are those the generic stainless brake lines you picked up at the oil and gas place you mentioned earlier? are they working out OK? will they continue to work with the calipers at the nine o clock? Thanks for the insight.

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I just read somewhere that the optimum position (clock) is at the nine o clock so maybe the strut swap is the better choice. I think I will swap mine when I drop them for the perch collars in the next few weeks. I will post some findings at that time. Thanks for the video. Are those the generic stainless brake lines you picked up at the oil and gas place you mentioned earlier? are they working out OK? will they continue to work with the calipers at the nine o clock? Thanks for the insight.

 

I'm not any kind of brake expert.  My understanding is that the caliper in the 3 o'clock position tends to lift the rear end more than in the 9 o'clock position, but I would think that the 9 o' position would want to lift the front wheel more.  I seriously doubt that even with "hard" driving, there would be any noticeable difference.  6 o'clock will work too, but bleeding the brakes would be a real bitch.

 

Doug said that his lines will reach either position....he's thinking about doing the strut swap at some point.  Yes, the lines are from Oil Filter Services in Portland, but you can get the same thing through Summit if I remember right.

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The Suspension isn't affected by where on the rotor the caliper is placed when you are using a proper bracket like you have. Location is about bleeder being up so air isn't trapped in the caliper and clearance for steer arms. Suspension geometry can be changed though for more or less squat under braking.

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