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Draker

Electric cooling fans - Two pullers or One pusher?

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Idk about the 7.5 but I can barely here the 10s on mine. I was thinking of adding a small light that will come on when the fans do

 

If you do add a light can you show me how you wired it?

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If you do add a light can you show me how you wired it?

Run the fans on a relay. Wire the light in to low amperage side of the circuit. Doesn't matter if it is on power side or ground side of the low amp circuit. When the circuit is activated by whatever switch (automatic or manual), the light will turn on.

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Run the fans on a relay. Wire the light in to low amperage side of the circuit. Doesn't matter if it is on power side or ground side of the low amp circuit. When the circuit is activated by whatever switch (automatic or manual), the light will turn on.

Do you have a diagram?

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This one is a bit different than what i described.

 

electric-fan-wiring-diagram-Also-here-is

 

Here they put the light on the high power side and gave it it's own ground.

 

The way i described would put the light on the yellow wire coming from 85. Install it in line before the switches, power in one side and out the other, so it grounds through a switch when the switch turns on.

 

Both work fine.

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Watch the fans. Make sure they are actually pushing and not pulling.

 

Last weekend I started and warmed up my 710. Fans come on for 10 seconds and off for about one minute. Seems that in the summer when it was warmer it was 10 and off for 30 sec.

So mine did that initially and it turned out to be a bad relay.  If I tapped on it then it would turn back on.  Replaced the relay and that solved that.  FYI my fans are setup to run for a few minutes after I shut off the car just like Ze German cars do. When I replaced the relay I hooked it up that way (temporarily) since it was running a bit hot to try and cut down on heat soak.  Anyway since I am ordering my wire this week I think I am going to replace my fans and radiator too so I only have to wire everything up once.

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I've run a Sirocco radiator for years, with 1) 10" pusher, and 1) 10" puller, with them offset to cover the width of the core.

Works fine, even on 105 degree Texas weather.

One fan is wired up with the ignition, and the other through the Sirocco temp switch.

 

Only thing, the cheap ass fans I buy only last 2 years at the most.

Maybe if I wasn't a cheap ass, and buy better quality fans, that would be less of a problem.

 

Are you using the Scirocco shroud too?  Just curious if I should grab one of those from world pac or go with the koyo or a fluidyne or something.

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As long as the power is from a non switched source the fans will come on or stay on after the engine is shut off. I see no advantage to shutting them off with the key.

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So I figured I'll pull the trigger on some pushers and test fit them as pullers. Glad I went that route because the fans are too wide to fit as pullers. Even if, I'd have to run a 8" or 9" and a 6.5" which is less cfm.

 

Mock up as puller. No clearance.

 

20171109_192533.jpg

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Post image is being a bitch... more pics later

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What are you doing for your fan controller?

I just bought a thermostat switch and relay. Switch is on at 185, off at 175. Probably a little low, but should be okay. I'll wire in a fan LED in the cabin to know when they kick on.

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It was pretty cheap on amazon.

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I just bought a thermostat switch and relay. Switch is on at 185, off at 175. Probably a little low, but should be okay. I'll wire in a fan LED in the cabin to know when they kick on.

 

Thread in probe? Or the o e you stuff through the fins?

 

I ask because I'm looking in to doing e-fan(s). Just gathering who's doing what, where.

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Thread in probe? Or the o e you stuff through the fins?

I ask because I'm looking in to doing e-fan(s). Just gathering who's doing what, where.

Thread in, but not sure where I'm going to put it yet since I'm a already running two gauges. There is another spot on the koyo.. maybe it will go there.

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I did two fans hooked to a dual temp bmw switch. It turns on one fan at low (190 degrees) and turns on a second fan if it reaches high temp (210). Also the second fan is tied to my AC wiring so the second fan will run full time whenever the AC is on.

 

Thread in switch in radiator. Pulled from a bmw. Junkyard fuse/relay block. Two small Honda fans that may not be adequate to the job.

 

That's in my "half pint" 510 wagon thread.

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dq_10.1_fan_switch_photo1.jpg

 

I have similar to this one from a '90s 200sx. It goes in the return hose just cut out 3" and two hose clamps. Run this through a relay and 30 amp fuse. It should be powered at all times and NOT through the ignition.

 

Don't put in the inlet hose. Give the rad a chance to do it's job first or the fan will be on when not needed.

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I recently found a great writeup on fan controllers. It's got links to other pages which also had a ton of other info - http://www.240turbo.com/ElectricCoolingFans.html

 

His 4 speed fan controller is a work f genius and a lot of testing, a bit bulky though - http://www.240turbo.com/fanharness.html

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I've never used a fan controller that didn't let me down.  I've gone to thermostatic switches in the head.  Much simpler and more effective long term.  On at 180, off at 170 or something like that.  

https://www.ebay.com/itm/185-175-Degree-Electric-Radiator-Engine-Cooling-Fan-Thermostat-Temp-Switch-/262564045727

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Me too. I've only had fan control failures. My Volvo V70 T5 had a massive electronic controller that went out and instead of spending the money I tried a cheapie from Hayden (I think) and it could barely handle the amp draw of the OEM Volvo fans. So my solution (though not pretty) was a pair of Ford continous duty solenoids. It worked, but was ugly.

 

The reason I like the info in the links I shared above is because it seems that guy has had similar problems and has worked hard to figure them out.

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Odd, I have a pair of Subaru fans and 20 amp fuse between a 720 Nissan relay and + battery. I put spare fuses and an extra relay in the glove box when I read you saying about this huge draw on start up before. It works just fine with the 20 amp. 

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There are a few fans on the market these days that pull very high amperage. The fans in my V70 had 50 amps of draw on startup.

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On initial start up of an electric motor it's basically an almost dead short. Current will spike but drop off quickly as it revs up. This is why electric cars have torrid take off torque. The start up is rapid enough on mine it hasn't time to blow the fuse or harm the relay. (well so far)

 

 

I don't know what the Nissan relays of the '80s and '90s could handle. They're quite robust. 

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Spal makes relays that can handle a 50 Amp spike.  They're the only ones I have seen that require a jumbo spade terminal - bigger than the hard to find extra large ones.  

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