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ColdSaus

B210 Rear Suspension conversion

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Hey Ratsun,

 

Iv'e been researching the suspension modifications and assemblies for a datsun b210, and how the rear suspension is set up, it seems like the area where the rear shocks are mounted can house a full coilover assembly. If some of the leaf springs were removed, would the leaf spring assembly still have the stability to keep the rear axle in place? I don't have a B for a reference, so correct me if i'm wrong; but if the leaf springs can't maintain stability, could a brace be used in place of the leaf springs? I'm thinking of a brace similar in design to a shock, but can easily be collapsed and rotates at the point where the axle meets the leaf as well as the point where the end of the leaf spring connects.

 

As always, thanks for the help.  

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you have to triangulate the rear end in a way that in can move up and down but still be stable 

for reference look up 4 link designs

 as an option one leaf might keep it stable with coil over shocks for strength  but havent heard of anyone doing this 

also need to make sure the shock mount area is strong enough to support the cars weight 

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1st gen camaros came with a factory option that was one leaf in the spring and a set of air shocks. If GM was comfortable with that idea from the factory, i would be willing to do it with coilovers.

 

But yes, mount location strength still needs to be checked.

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1st gen camaros came with a factory option that was one leaf in the spring and a set of air shocks. If GM was comfortable with that idea from the factory, i would be willing to do it with coilovers.

 

But yes, mount location strength still needs to be checked.

 

 

But those camaros also have a rod coming from the bottom of axle up to the body cuz without them they hop like a rabbit ,, well,, even with them actually .. . And if i remember right ,  the shocks are staggered front and back .. Most people that drove the shit outta them also retro fitted a panhard bar too.

 

I didn't have camaro i had 67 firebird with a 455 installed but same difference . But my memory fades so ,,,,

 

 

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What's wrong with the leaf spring set up??? I had a new '76 B-210 and it worked just fine.

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 as an option one leaf might keep it stable with coil over shocks for strength  but havent heard of anyone doing this 

 

I've done this. Worked well for me. Your mileage may vary.

 

I've also seen others do this to more easily install air bags. The one leaf will be soft enough that it will squat all the way down, but are stiff enough torsionally to keep the geometry correct. 

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Also sedan (trunk) or coupe (hatchback)? It will be relatively simple on a sedan. It gets a good bit more complex on a coupe, bordering on impossible. 

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But those camaros also have a rod coming from the bottom of axle up to the body cuz without them they hop like a rabbit ,, well,, even with them actually .. . And if i remember right ,  the shocks are staggered front and back .. Most people that drove the shit outta them also retro fitted a panhard bar too.

 

I didn't have camaro i had 67 firebird with a 455 installed but same difference . But my memory fades so ,,,,

 

 

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.Panhard rod!

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I'm not seeing why replacing the leaf spring suspension is necessary.

 

A single leaf is a bad way to keep the rear axle centered laterally. Under extreme loading in a corner, the leaf will twist. To make the axle stable you need all the leaves.

 

If looking to lower just get lowering blocks and longer U bolts, what? $30 maybe. Axle is secure, spring rate is the same, no guessing with coils.

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If looking to lower just get lowering blocks and longer U bolts, what? $30 maybe. Axle is secure, spring rate is the same, no guessing with coils.

 

But what if you want the option of trying out different spring rates? This can get very expensive with leaf springs. 

 

Regardless of what all the low junkies will tell you, this is the real reason for coilovers. Spring selection and corner weighting. 

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Hey Ratsun,

 

Iv'e been researching the suspension modifications and assemblies for a datsun b210, and how the rear suspension is set up, it seems like the area where the rear shocks are mounted can house a full coilover assembly. If some of the leaf springs were removed, would the leaf spring assembly still have the stability to keep the rear axle in place? I don't have a B for a reference, so correct me if i'm wrong; but if the leaf springs can't maintain stability, could a brace be used in place of the leaf springs? I'm thinking of a brace similar in design to a shock, but can easily be collapsed and rotates at the point where the axle meets the leaf as well as the point where the end of the leaf spring connects.

 

As always, thanks for the help.  

What is the goal? Stance, drag, autocross, offroad

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Yes, vague post without enough info on the intent. While coil overs are adjustable.... once you get the height where you want it they become expensive dead weight.

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Was gonna start a topic to get different ideas on a rear suspension set up. Guess i'll steal this one. Anyways, can anyone tell me what setup for lowering you use as far as the shocks, blocks, and leaf springs? Thanks in advance.

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Was gonna start a topic to get different ideas on a rear suspension set up. Guess i'll steal this one. Anyways, can anyone tell me what setup for lowering you use as far as the shocks, blocks, and leaf springs? Thanks in advance.

 

Sedan (trunk) or coupe (hatchback)?

 

3" blocks, spring stiffeners, and some KYBs for a total drop of 2.5".

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Sedan. but any 3" blocks will do? I really just want to stick with 2" so it won't bottom out or unless that spring stiffener will keep it from bottoming out when using the 3"blocks. I will check out some kyb. Need to see if belltech make some for b210's. Thanks for the info. 

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Sedan.

 

Shocks for an '82-92 Camaro should fit and be 2" shorter. 

 

 

but any 3" blocks will do?

 

Blocks are fairly universal. Shackles are not. 

 

 

unless that spring stiffener will keep it from bottoming out 

 

That's why we use them.   B)

 

 

I really just want to stick with 2" 

 

2" without stiffeners will bottom out. Often. 

 

2" with stiffeners will only get you a 1.5" drop. 

 

In my opinion, 2.5" in the rear is perfect for a B210 sedan. 

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On my 1200 coupe the ride height is adjusted via the rear shackles per the Datsun competition suspension manual. If one were trying to get the corner weights set you could come up with a set of blocks in small increments.

 

As for the spring rates I'd find out what rates the Nissan Motorsports springs units where and work from there. For a road car I'd focus on not so much the rates but the difference between front and rear. It's been ages since I had my B210 street car but I think I used a Z car spring in front, stock rear springs, ADCO anti-sway bars, Koni wet inserts front and Koni classic rears.

 

As for lateral location I'd use bushings like the ones in the 1200 suspension manual; it takes R compound tires to put enough force in the springs to get lateral flex and even then most drivers aren't likely to put enough force in them.

 

Tom

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Shocks for an '82-92 Camaro should fit and be 2" shorter. 

 

 

 

Blocks are fairly universal. Shackles are not. 

 

 

 

That's why we use them.   B)

 

 

 

2" without stiffeners will bottom out. Often. 

 

2" with stiffeners will only get you a 1.5" drop. 

 

In my opinion, 2.5" in the rear is perfect for a B210 sedan. 

Thanks for the info., man. I really appreciate it.

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2.5" rear, 3" front.

 

 

 

On 14s

428bf4993c962f84b96edc8626686ade.jpg

 

 

On 15s

datsun-210-1975-8.jpg

This sitting on 3" kyb shocks and what leaf spring stiffeners you use?

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This sitting on 3" kyb shocks 

 

Yes, that car is the exact combo I described. 

 

 

what leaf spring stiffeners you use?

 

That was a link to click in the words.   ;)

 

 

 

They make them in 500, 1000, and 1500 pound rates. I am 99.9% sure we used the 1000 pound version.

 

Double check the length on them before you buy. Datsun leaf springs is hell of short, yo...   ^_^

 

If it helps, most chain auto parts stores sell these if you want to check them out before you buy them. 

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If you are lowering using blocks you don't need shorter shocks. The only thing that moves is the axle being spaced upward by the drop block. If you reduce the shock length there is the risk of it running out of travel going over a bump in the road. If this happens, the rear wheels will stop extending and leave the pavement. Not good.

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If you are lowering using blocks you don't need shorter shocks. The only thing that moves is the axle being spaced upward by the drop block. If you reduce the shock length there is the risk of it running out of travel going over a bump in the road. If this happens, the rear wheels will stop extending and leave the pavement. Not good.

 

On a coupe, you are correct. On a sedan (which he has), you are incorrect. 

 

On a coupe, the shock attaches to the lower plate that the springs rest on. So yes, blocks don't affect shock length at all.

 

On the sedan, the shock attaches to the back side of the axle housing itself. So when you lower the car, the shocks need to be shorter. 

 

 

 

For reference, 1200 diagram, but the gist is the same...

 

 

24932.jpg

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Interesting. Now if I can just learn from this.

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