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emceefarlane

Jake's 320 Build

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Bummer. I would like to have found out if it worked or not.

 

I like the idea of leaving the pump body for aesthetics.

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*edit - after connecting this all up today it seems as though the pump doesn't want to lift from the tank mounted here - even though it's within the parameters specified for the pump. i'm going to try and relocate underneath the tank and see how that goes

 

this is how i've mounted the electric pump. i'm going to wire it through a relay and a kill switch with the pos from the ignition. not through an oil pressure switch like i know i'm supposed to

 

2me8ylt.jpg

 

the plate to separate the top and bottom half of the mechanical pump

 

jjn3hz.jpg

 

the pump put together with the plate and a gasket. removed the arm because it's not doing anything and put the pin back in so no water/dirt gets in the crankcase

 

21lqzo2.jpg

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Yeah, those pumps don't like to be above the tank. You need a bit of gravity to make them work well and last long. A lot of people install them incorrectly and  lot of people have problems because of that.

 

When I use a Facet pump, I try to get it as close to the tank as possible and mounted underneath the lowest point of the tank.

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*edit - the pump works well in this location now, just took a lot more priming than expected and i think there may have been a small air leak that was hindering the operation

 

*edit - after connecting this all up today it seems as though the pump doesn't want to lift from the tank mounted here - even though it's within the parameters specified for the pump. i'm going to try and relocate underneath the tank and see how that goes

 

this is how i've mounted the electric pump. i'm going to wire it through a relay and a kill switch with the pos from the ignition. not through an oil pressure switch like i know i'm supposed to

 

2me8ylt.jpg

 

 

 

Okay so now i've sorted the electric pump out - with the added pressure (pump is now pushing - not sucking) the original glass bowl fuel filter and the gasket i used in the dummy mounted mechanical pump are leaking. I've bypassed both of them for now so i could take it for a drive. Worked out that the float valve in the carburetor doesn't work because if you leave it idling for too long the sight glass fills up and the car starts to run and sound like it has a heavy cam in it.

 

Brakes need another bleed again i think as it still feels a bit squishy. Other than that it drives pretty well

 

Looking forward to getting it back on the road coming into spring

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Not much is more exciting then the first drive after a long time sitting. Teardown is a bit more exciting, but barely.

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okay so brake bleeding - bad times

 

i couldn't get the pedal firm no matter how much bleeding i did. went through and tried to tighten everything to make sure it was all sweet. found the brake pressure switch was leaking out the top of the bakelite bit.

 

bought a new brake pressure switch for $26. fuelmiser

 

ivl1c5.jpg

 

looks exactly like this 

 

169hnvt.jpg

 

okay so with the old switch the entire thread went into the manifold that it screws into, the new switch got tight with around half of the thread still exposed - is that an issue? also how to you bleed the switch because it's at the very top point of the brake system and i don't think normal bleeding of the slave cylinders or even the manifold block will displace the air in it? am i just being paranoid?

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It may be the difference between BSPT and NPT. I didn't think 320's had BSPT on them anywherre so maybe it's just a bit larger. You could always run a tap into the tee where the switch goes. Just a couple turns. If it's in more than 3 threads, I wouldn't worry about it.

 

As far as bleeding, you could crack the line at the master and do the normal bleeding procedure there. Bleeding at the wheels will work, but it may take a few days for the air bubbles to work their way around. When I bleed a system for the first time, I don't expect to get all the air. I usually let it sit for a couple days and then bleed again.

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It may be the difference between BSPT and NPT. I didn't think 320's had BSPT on them anywherre so maybe it's just a bit larger. You could always run a tap into the tee where the switch goes. Just a couple turns. If it's in more than 3 threads, I wouldn't worry about it.

 

As far as bleeding, you could crack the line at the master and do the normal bleeding procedure there. Bleeding at the wheels will work, but it may take a few days for the air bubbles to work their way around. When I bleed a system for the first time, I don't expect to get all the air. I usually let it sit for a couple days and then bleed again.

 

Good information here. I ran into this issue on installing a pressure gage on the oil sender port when rebuilding the E1 engine. I can't remember which exactly is larger but BSPT is a straight thread (British Straight Pipe Thread; S=straight) and NPT is a taper thread (National Pipe Taper; T=taper) and there is about .020 or .5mm difference in diameter at the start of thread and one is 27 and the other is 28 threads per inch in pitch. Some important stuff to keep in mind when dealing with the senders and fuel pump fittings. Steve

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Good information here. I ran into this issue on installing a pressure gage on the oil sender port when rebuilding the E1 engine. I can't remember which exactly is larger but BSPT is a straight thread (British Straight Pipe Thread; S=straight) and NPT is a taper thread (National Pipe Taper; T=taper) and there is about .020 or .5mm difference in diameter at the start of thread and one is 27 and the other is 28 threads per inch in pitch. Some important stuff to keep in mind when dealing with the senders and fuel pump fittings. Steve

Actually BSP is straight and BSPT is tapered. The T=taper.

 

NPT is not larger by design, but it seems most NPT fittings do have a larger diameter. Probably just a difference in manufaturing design. It would be like the "as built" phrase in building permits. The design was as such, but it changed so...as built.

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Replaced all the copper washers and bleeder nipples. Bled through a clear brake fluid so i could be sure it was reaching the all of the slave cylinders, then bled through the blue coloured brake fluid again. Still no good

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Had someone have a look at the brakes who is much more qualified than i am.

 

He started by clamping all the flexi hoses at each cylinder shut (only one for the back two). this allows you to test the master cylinder - if it's firm then there's no problem - if it's not then it could be leaking/not compressing/have air in it. My master cylinder turned out to be fine.

Keeping pressure on the pedal remove the clamps individually and see if the pedal drops dramatically when this is done. Put the clamps back on before testing the other cylinders.

The pedal dropped around a 1/4 for each of the front cylinders and more than 1/2 for the back two. it was determined that the problem in this case was an adjustment issue. i had rebuilt all of the adjusters but in putting them back on had not adjusted them correctly. The service manual states tightening the adjusters until the wheel is locked and then backing off only 3 turns - i did this initially but it seemed to have far too much drag so i backed them off more. i was wrong - there needs to be a significant amount more drag than i had (could move the hub freely but could hear the shoes rubbing) the hub is now far tighter with a lot more drag. 

All this accompanied by drums that have been machined just past their limits means the poor performance from my brakes was not related to the hydraulics.

I plan to take the car for a drive and see how the brakes react now that they are adjusted correctly to determine weather i will buy new drums straight away or just wait it out.

The front shoes were also mounted the wrong way around - even though i'm positive that i had referenced a picture in the manual when re fitting them but ah well

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Picked these up last week

 

1" & 1/2 - came off a Volvo - dunno what type

 

2nkswb6.jpg

 

hopefully they wont need too much love because i really have no idea how to give them love

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Those will be cool on the 320.

 

SU's are the easiest carbs on the planet to rebuild. Even if they are all clapped out, they can still function. You just need to make sure that the throttle shafts are not bent and spin freely, that the fuel bowls are not gunked up, all orofices are clear, the hose on bottom is not cracked, the needles aren't bent and the slides work properly and don't hang up.

 

Mark the lids and slides so they go back on the carb bodies that they came from.

 

Easy peasy.

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I have been replacing exhaust studs & washers, thermostat housing studs and all the little extras on my J15 with MG replacement stuff, great source of bits!

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Hey Jake cool little 320!

Su's are a great carb. I had them on my J15 and they make a huge difference in pickup...you can actually overtake without a huge run-up :) You might have to run a fuel regulator though as su's don't like high pressure and then maybe a fuel return line to save your pump overworking.

I've been reading your thread and I've just picked up a 320 I was happy to see it was an E1 as I have the Su's(hitachis) sitting idle.

Good to see another Aussie 320 for a bit of inspiration! If you come across another Tub let me know and I'll come across from Vic for a visit ;)

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I picked up some sss hitachis and used the carbs on the MGB manifold. Just ground the stock linkages down as the spacing is different. It was hill-billy but it worked :P 

DSC_0548-1.jpg

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Hey Jake cool little 320!

Su's are a great carb. I had them on my J15 and they make a huge difference in pickup...you can actually overtake without a huge run-up :) You might have to run a fuel regulator though as su's don't like high pressure and then maybe a fuel return line to save your pump overworking.

I've been reading your thread and I've just picked up a 320 I was happy to see it was an E1 as I have the Su's(hitachis) sitting idle.

Good to see another Aussie 320 for a bit of inspiration! If you come across another Tub let me know and I'll come across from Vic for a visit ;)

 

Thanks dude!

 

i'll keep an eye out - a lot have been coming up on gumtree recently - depends how much you're willing to pay for a 1 spare of everything i guess

 

how low does the pressure have to be? pretty sure i bought the lowest electric one possible which was like 3 - 6 psi or something

 

love the agricultural numberlpate heatshield/spring set up you've got going on

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I checked the pressure on my stock mechanical pump (stock enough to have the priming loop on the pump) and it checked just under 2psi. I was checking several things suggested by Stephen at Pierce Manifolds to get some re-jetting advice (& jets) for the 32/36 Weber. Very helpful people, indeed.

 

Steve

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Been buying Webers. Weber parts, and manifolds from pierce manifolds for over 30 years they are knowledgeable Weber people.  More than happy to help.  Just good people.

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Thanks dude!

 

i'll keep an eye out - a lot have been coming up on gumtree recently - depends how much you're willing to pay for a 1 spare of everything i guess

 

how low does the pressure have to be? pretty sure i bought the lowest electric one possible which was like 3 - 6 psi or something

 

love the agricultural numberlpate heatshield/spring set up you've got going on

Yeah probably will mean buying another ute :)

 

http://mgaguru.com/mgtech/fuel/fp202.htm 

 

This says 1.5 to 3.5psi. I ran 3psi I think in my HR Just used the regulator shown and stock pump no return. On the J15 I had an OK stock pump and no regulator

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more fuel pump issues

 

took it for another drive and it stopped about 200 meters up the street. Checked under the hood and the fuel bowl was empty. disconnected the supply line and the pressure from the pump was pathetic - enough to keep the car at idle but anything more than that it couldn't cope with. which is weird because it had worked fine the 5+ time it was driven prior. Back on the hoist.

 

Drained the fuel tank and blew through all the lines and tank with compressed air

 

Decided to remount the pump under the bottom of the tank on the chassis (only place i could fit it under the car that didn't interfere with a brake line and allowed for it to be on the 45° angle it needs) and run a separate ground wire back to the negative terminal of the battery - it seems to be running okay for the moment. i have a spare just incase.

 

it fit pretty well under this bend in the brake line

 

2j5ngc2.jpg

 

i ran the supply from the pump between the space between the cab and the chassis

 

ri6q2h.jpg

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It's been a long time since I have used one of those types of pumps as the primary source of fuel pressure. I usually use them to feed a mechanical pump or in the case of my two 1970's Chevy trucks, to prime the system after they sit for a while (the fuel mysteriously drains back into the tank, don't know why).

 

If you continue to have problems with that solenoid style pump, you may just want to upgrade to a Bosch gerotor style pump or a Carter vane style pump. The problem with these two is that they make a lot of noise, so I use custom mountings to isolate the noise from the body. But this just opens a can of worms as you would need to add a pressure regulator and maybe even a return line to get the best performance.

 

Didn't you find a stock style mechanical pump? I would use that and eliminate these problems altogether.

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