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Are any of you walkers???


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3 hours ago, datsunfreak said:

 

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😁

 

A broken picture. But I can imagine, as I've seen the trees that grow there.

 

It is said that everything is bigger in Texas. There is a lot of wide open spaces, beautiful cities with snakepits for freeways (Dallas_Fort Worth).

 

 

I've been all over Texas, one of my cousins lives southeast of Seguin.  But what you all call a tree, we call a bush. So trees must not be included in that statement.

 

This picture is of a tree in the woods by the river I live along, growing from the stump of an old growth tree. You can we one of the springboard notches that the woodsmen cut to place a board to stand on while they pulled the saw back and forth. The stump is about 10 feet tall, and about 6 feet in diameter. A medium sized tree for here back in the day.

 

 

 

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This shot is on the riverbank right behind my house. The evergreen tree on the left is around 100 feet tall. Behind it are some cottonwood and alder trees. The tree lying on the right fell a few years ago, it looks like it had rotten roots. It was also around 100 feet tall. 

 

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34252166874_c203aabfc7_b.jpg

 

Looks sort of like a spruce. Got scaly bark? They like to grow near water or high rainfall areas.

 

35687753251_87bba47b47_b.jpg

 

We have similar with springboard cuts in the old stump. Hemlock take root in the old stump and send down roots like this. If there is an old stump chances are that it will have a hemlock growing on top of it.

 

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Cedar by the looks of it.

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11 hours ago, Racer X 69 said:

It is said that everything is bigger in Texas. There is a lot of wide open spaces, beautiful cities with snakepits for freeways (Dallas_Fort Worth).

 

I've been all over Texas, one of my cousins lives southeast of Seguin.  But what you all call a tree, we call a bush. So trees must not be included in that statement.

 

Most trees here top out at around 40-50 feet, but we have plenty of those. Mostly oak, pecans, and the occasional cedar. The heavily forested areas in east Texas are mostly big pines (50-60ft+).

 

I find it sometimes funny (sometimes annoying) people's preconceived notions about Texas as though it's some monolithic place. Drive far enough and you can see any type of ecosystem imaginable. Well except maybe a tundra.  😋 

 

One fella from this very forum (from the PNW) recently visited and was shocked at just how green it is, which is not uncommon to hear. Especially from SoCal people. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, datsunfreak said:

 

Most trees here top out at around 40-50 feet, but we have plenty of those. Mostly oak, pecans, and the occasional cedar. The heavily forested areas in east Texas are mostly big pines (50-60ft+).

 

I find it sometimes funny (sometimes annoying) people's preconceived notions about Texas as though it's some monolithic place. Drive far enough and you can see any type of ecosystem imaginable. Well except maybe a tundra.  😋 

 

One fella from this very forum (from the PNW) recently visited and was shocked at just how green it is, which is not uncommon to hear. Especially from SoCal people. 

 

 


For sure the landscape is varied, dry barren desert, grasslands, and the scrub pines.
 

The trees in east Texas look like the tallest in the state, guess they didn’t look as tall as they are.

 

The grasslands are green during the rainy season, but quickly turn golden brown when the rain stops.
 

If it wasn’t for the searing heat in the summer I might consider retiring there. Guess I have spent far too long in the Pacific Northwet, and have grown accustomed to the climate here.

 

And I would miss the snow.  

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2 hours ago, Racer X 69 said:

For sure the landscape is varied, dry barren desert, grasslands, and the scrub pines.

 

Everything you describe there is west Texas. I had to google what a "scrub pine" is...  😁

 

The central hill country is the most scenic part. Lots of lovely spots for hiking (look at me, staying on topic!)...

 

Fall...

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Spring...

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2 hours ago, Racer X 69 said:

If it wasn’t for the searing heat in the summer I might consider retiring there. Guess I have spent far too long in the Pacific Northwet, and have grown accustomed to the climate here.

 

Yeah, the heat is a bitch. we are just now coming out of it the last few weeks. It's nice right now, and this is my prime camping/hiking season.  👍

 

I have spent a fair bit of time in the Portland/Canby/Oregon City/Salem area and would LOVE to move there some day...

Edited by datsunfreak
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8 hours ago, datsunfreak said:

 

Everything you describe there is west Texas. I had to google what a "scrub pine" is...  😁

 

The central hill country is the most scenic part. Lots of lovely spots for hiking (look at me, staying on topic!)...

 

Fall...

texashillcountry-1964916ee2535f9d5888dc9

 

Spring...

7ec8ccb0.jpg?impolicy=fcrop&w=670&h=385&

 

 

 

Yeah, the heat is a bitch. we are just now coming out of it the last few weeks. It's nice right now, and this is my prime camping/hiking season.  👍

 

Beautiful countryside. Is that north of Dallas?

 

I've been between Dallas and Tulsa quite a few times, on 35. It looks like a place I will explore some after I get retired. Probably when it isn't tornado season.

 

And I want to get out to Sweetwater for the rattlesnake roundup. 

 

There is a place west of Fort Worth on 287, Catfish O'Harlies. I love catfish. Stopped there everytime I passed by, which was a lot. 287 runs from Dallas all the way to Denver, a great shortcut to Seattle. Miles and miles of lonely two lane highway.

 

Also been East from Dallas to Shreveport, and Dallas to Little Rock. There are lots of trees out that way, short deciduous trees. Nice, green, hilly countryside. Lots of snake farms. 

 

What is up with all the snake farms?

 

 

This is what the landscape looks like out where my cousin lives southeast of Seguin.

 

genMid.427930_2.jpg

 

 

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16 hours ago, Racer X 69 said:

Beautiful countryside. Is that north of Dallas?

 

That photo is of the Frio River in the central hill country. All of the prettiest stuff is here...

 

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Most of the people escaping from the west coast end up here, close to Austin or Waco...

 

Or Denton (north of DFW) due to it's small town feel, hipster vibe, and woodsy surrounding areas...

 

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Edited by datsunfreak
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  • 3 weeks later...

146.9 miles in last 31 days or 4.7 miles a day.  I lost 4 days visiting for Thanksgiving. I did walk every day but no idea the distance. Over 6 miles yesterday and over 8 miles today to try and catch up but didn't make it.

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Very much the same. I grew up with English cooking, you know where everything is boiled to submission. Only later away from home did it become truly North American. When the kids were teens they always had several friends over that had no way to celebrate Thanksgiving. Put 2 extra leaves in the kitchen table and drag extra chairs in from other rooms. All counter space was covered in serving bowls that had to wait to be passed around. It would take 2 or more pictures to get everyone included. If there are so many dish choices that you couldn't try them all and fit them on your plate. I considered that a successful meal. During the meal everyone would be asked to mention even just one thing they were thankful for.

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  • 1 month later...

Well since November 12 till today, (31 days with one day missed) I still managed to walk 165 miles or 5.328 miles per day every day. Slightly more as the tide comes in around 8 AM for a few days and if there are waves I can't access part of the shore and have to detour up to the highway and back down to get past it

 

Can't leave till near 8 now it's too dark. Colder (frosty) and wetter and snow last Monday, still some of it around in the shade.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I don't leave home without it.

 

God damn snow. Like to get 8k or more a day but you can't walk sloggin through 8". Only got 3 today walking around the neighborhood and only because the plough finally went by. Shoveled out the end of the driveway. Today the sun came up one minute earlier than the solstice. Days are getting longer but not fast enough. Tomorrow is -5C in the morning, have to bring the hummingbird feeders in.

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datzenmike, do you sell the walking sticks you make?

 

I was just browsing on Etsy and see overdone commercial looking crap and some sticks that look like some effort was made to be artistic. Could be profitable.

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So far I've given them away, only a few. It allowed me to experiment and try different things. For X mass I got myself a Dremel. In the woods this fall I twisted several tall thin flexible maple suckers into a pig tail. Maybe in a few years they will grow into a cork screw.

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  • 3 weeks later...

4.92 miles per day average for this year because of the snow. Yesterday I walked down the tacks to the next town. Just over 11 miles round trip. Some yards back on the tracks but mostly through the woods so shady and mossy. Might do this during the summer in the shade. 

 

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First trestle is over 120 ties long and a good 120 feet down to the river.

 

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Second one is over Washer Creek and probably 1/3 as high.

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  • 2 months later...

i've thought about doing hour long day walks at a brisk pace because long low intensity cardio like that is supposed to be the best if you are trying to maintain muscle mass (body builders etc) (I do powerlifting/strongman stuff) but I never feel like I have the time to walk for an entire hour. So it's crazy to me that you go for these super long walks... but I think it's badass... 

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 At first your core muscles ache from the unaccustomed use and then your hips and ankles but after a few months this goes away. Later, after the first mile you can't feel the act of walking and you float. Think of it as moving meditation. Often what looks like a long way the first time becomes shorter with use. It's the same distance but you're less aware of the traveling. You start to see all distances as shorter and simply a matter of time needed to travel it. If time awareness is compressed so is the awareness of distance traveled. It's not all one long blissful unawareness but a series if them. I'm sure there is a word for this.  

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