Jump to content

A14 fun factor


sick620

Recommended Posts

I am not new to driving datsuns with l series engines, but I am new to A series engines. Just picked up a 78 b210 with an A14. It was last registered in 88 so its going to be a minute before I get it going down the road. I was going to take it apart and do a budget rebuild new gaskets and rings etc, but before I do I'm wondering if these cars can be any fun with the original powerplant. I used to have all kinds of fun in my stock l20b datsun 620's with a weber and not much else done to them, they were not fast but I still was able to goof around in them and have a good time. A series motors have a lot less torque and HP, but these 210 chassis cars are a lot lighter right? after a quick rebuild and weber and maybe headers and exhaust will I have fun in one of these cars with an A series? or are they so god awfully underpowered that there is no way to have any fun and I should just go straight into looking for a l20b. nap z, KA etc?... I just want a fun Datsun I can cruise on the weekends and goof off in a little, I don't care at all about speed, just fun.   

 

I guess what im saying is:

 

does stock l series car = stock A series car for fun factor?

 

what are the best bang for buck mods to do to an A series engine to get a horsepower or two when you already have it taken apart doing a basic rebuild? 

 

Edited by sick620
Link to comment
  • Replies 12
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

If you're willing to redefine what constitutes fun, you'll have a blast. My girlfriend in high school had a B210 and let me tell you, the thing was gutless, but holy christ did we have fun doing it in that Datsun! 

 

Along with a bigger carb and exhaust header, you may get a few ponies out of milling a bit off the head to raze compression and run it on premium. 

Edited by paradime
  • Haha 1
Link to comment
6 minutes ago, paradime said:

If you're willing to redefine what constitutes fun, you'll have a blast. My girlfriend in high school had a B210 and let me tell you, the thing was gutless, but holy christ did we have fun doing it in that Datsun! 

doing it or DOING IT? haha was it fun the times you weren't actively DOING IT? 🤣

Link to comment
1 minute ago, sick620 said:

doing it or DOING IT? haha was it fun the times you weren't actively DOING IT? 🤣

 

We tried DOING IT but the car was so damn small I got a cramp. 

 

My first car was a 68' 510, and as are as driving fun goes, there was no comparison. 

Link to comment
1 minute ago, paradime said:

 

We tried DOING IT but the car was so damn small I got a cramp. 

 

My first car was a 68' 510, and as are as driving fun goes, there was no comparison. 

Haha okay so I should just find a l series or do a carbed ka24e swap probably at the minimum

Link to comment

AK24 might be a bit much on the torque side, and with all the weight up front it may take it from fun straight into tariffing. I say do the rebuild and if you're still considering a swap, I'd go L all the way.

Link to comment

I love the A motors. Parts interchangeability between A motors is pretty good, with the exception of the A12, which has a front mounted distributor and a driver side mounted alternator. The A12A, A13, A14 and A15 all have mid mounted distributors to make room for the alternator mounted high on the passenger side.

 

Building power with an A motor will require some internal mods though. As with any engine, a higher compression ratio, better flowing cylinder head and bigger cam do the trick. My parts knowledge for street driven A motors is almost non-existent, as most of the A motors I built were for SCCA GT5 racing, but if you travel over to the tech page at http://datsun1200.com/modules/mediawiki/index.php?title=Datsun_1200_encyclopedia  , you'll find all kinds of part numbers, casting numbers, etc.

 

Both of my Datsun 320 trucks were A motor swapped and both were really fun to drive. My L320 had a built A12 with a huge cam, some chamber and port work with a later cylinder head and a modified intake manifold and DGV Weber. That truck really did scream, and ran to 8K on a regular basis. The A14 I had in my NL320 was mostly stock, but with a GX head and dual SU carbs. It made more torque and was smooth as hell, but did not have the wow factor of the A12.

Link to comment

I've been racing a 1200 for last 32 years and I run a fairly mild set up. I give this advice every time this subject comes up.

 

For a street A-series engine go with the following: a Weber 32/36 carb, header, Delta cams 278 grind, 2" exhaust, dual valve springs, GX head gasket and clean up the ports in the head. I port my heads using nothing more than a dremel. The valve seats protrude into the head and restrict the flow. Check Datsun1200.com for.pics of porting.

 

All of that will get you 15-20hp more than stock. It won't be a rocket but it will rev like mad and be fun.

Edited by Tom1200
  • Like 2
Link to comment
On 10/13/2021 at 8:11 PM, Tom1200 said:

I've been racing a 1200 for last 32 years and I run a faulty mild set up. I give this advice every time this subject comes up.

 

For a street A-series engine go with the following: a Weber 32/36 carb, header, Delta cams 278 grind, 2" exhaust, dual valve springs, GX head gasket and clean up the ports in the head. I port my heads using nothing more than a dremel. The valve seats protrude into the head and restrict the flow. Check Datsun1200.com for.pics of porting.

 

All of that will get you 15-20hp more than stock. It won't be a rocket but it will rev like mad and be fun.

 Ok awesome this sounds like the plan. thanks for the cam grind info. Any benefit to lightening the flywheel?

Link to comment

Flywheels store kinetic energy and release it when starting from a stop to get the heavy ass vehicle moving without excessive revving and slipping the clutch. From then on, they are a liability as every time you speed up, some energy goes into speeding the flywheel up. Course it doesn't go to waste, you get it back when slowing down just like a truck with a heavy load. For strictly accelerating removing some weight frees up some power to move the car. If a race car, you only need enough flywheel to help keep the engine spinning as there are (hopefully) no stops. For the street I wouldn't go overboard lightening it as it adversely affects the take offs. I like to let the clutch up at idle and slowly pull away adding power and clutch for a seamless launch. Revving and slipping isn't for me. I have L4 car, truck and six cylinder L series flywheels. Car 4 cylinder and six cylinder are 21 pounds and trucks are 29. Trucks are 225 and 240mm pressure plates which are also heavier and add mass. The ZX car have heavier crank and rods for added mass. I do have a 21 and a 29 pound 240mm flywheel. The 21 may be from a 240sx?

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.