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Power steering for 510? is it possible

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Hi I was wondering if I can install power steering in a 510 for my girl. If so can anyone help me figure it this little mission! Thanks

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Hi I was wondering if I can install power steering in a 510 for my girl. If so can anyone help me figure it this little mission! Thanks

 

Little Mission? Heh, understatement of the year! here is a link that gives you an idea of your mission:

Power Steering

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Well, first these cars aren't very heavy and they aren't to hard to handle...... even for a girl. In all fairness girls were stronger 40 years ago I suppose. If you have wider tires this can add some effort.

 

Power steering was never an option on the 510 so some fabricating will be needed. It was available on the 280z/zx so the pump from one should fit the L 4 but I think it is where the fuel pump is mounted. As for the steering box the 280 might work. I have an S110 an '80 that has P/S and the standard steering box is very close looking to the 510/710 so maybe it will also work. Again it won't 'drop in' but maybe can be made to work.

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Eets possible. Easiest way might be an electric rack & pinion out of a 2000s decade car. Probably would have to shorten the rod ends and rethread them. Fabricate a ujoint for the steering column. weld a mount for it to the crossmember (like Icehouse did on his 510). Then connect the two wires...

Not an easy swap, but not too difficult either.

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Wat type of 2000's car would u say closes fit!

 

 

And thanks for all the help guys

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Wat type of 2000's car would u say closes fit!

No car will be a close fit. It will require modificaton and fabrication. But is it possible. Let us know how it works out.

 

There are several Datsun 510s with rack and pinion steering swaps. One uses a rack from a Datsun 200SX. Here's what he did:

 


  •  
  • Move the engine crossmember back a couple inches (which necessitates changes to the engine mounts)
  • Weld simple flat brackets to the x-member so the rack can be bolted on
  • Cut the tie-rod ends and weld them back shorter (make sure you have an expert welder do that). For proper handling, they need to be exactly the same length overall as the A-arm overall lengths
  • Use a newer steering column that has a flex-joint on the end. He used a 200SX column.
  • The swap had three u-joints and a fairly big angle from the end of the column to the rack, but

he said it works great, much better than the stock 510 steering box. No slop!

 

For power steering, you can either use a hydraulic system or a new electric type.

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ggzilla, hey I'm no expert on steering so... would it not be best to have a rack that closely mimics the stock pitman to idler arm distance? Or basically the same distance between the LCA mounting points to prevent bump steer?

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To prevent bump steer, steering linkage should be at the same height and same length as the LCA ball-joint pivot points. Additionally it should be the same distance fore/aft as the steering knuckle pivot points.

 

When swapping non-stock parts, the main goal is getting the same length as original between the steering arms (knuckle arms). Hence the need to cut down the rack ends to the right length. Generally you would mofify the rack's threaded shafts to take the Datsun side rod ends.

 

Rack & Pinion does not use a pitman or idler arm, so it makes it easier to fit. Sometime you can get these more optimum than the factory design where the original cross rod is tied to the idler. You want to locate the rack (if possible) in the same plane as the steering knuckle ends. But the factory didn't do that necessarily, so there is room to fudge. This also varies as the suspension moves up/down, so fit it at nominal height. That's why the better lowering technique fits strut spacers when lowering the suspension.

 

Then there is the whole discussion about moving the cross rod (or knuckles) up/down to favor correct geometry at partial suspension load instead of nominal height. We can leave that to the racers. For a street car, just figure it at nominal height.

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I forgot the most important part: the rack's inner pivot points should be the same distance apart as the inner LCA pivot points. Mike is exactly right, you should choose a rack with this dimension as close to the original as possible to prevent bump steer. I dunno if this can be modified.

 

That being said, some cars have tiny amounts of bump steer. You want to avoid it as much as possible or you end up with the car going generally straight ahead (trackng nicely) but occasionally darting left and right for no apparent reason. Bad stuff.

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Buy here a membership to Golds Gym.Cheaper and way easier for everyone concerned.

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Buy here a membership to Golds Gym.Cheaper and way easier for everyone concerned.

 

Absolutely right! Chick with chiseled body, my knees get weak.

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Back in the 90's one of the local guys installed power steering in his 510 and wrote up an article about in the 510 Again Newsletter. I think I might have that issue and will try to dig it up, unless someone has them handy and can double check.

 

From what I remeber he used all Datsun parts on it.

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