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Z24 engine best way to disable the fuel for compression test??


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Thanks for the instructions Mike . . . 

 

I'm most concerned with wedging the timing chain / tensioner before removing the cam sprocket. I doubt I'll be able to find a tool like the one pictured. Is that a Z or L series motor?

 

Having searched Google there are lots of diff dimensions for making a timber wedge and they are different I believe L and Z series . . . 

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The picture is an L series engine but will work on a Z series like you have. Only the tops of the chain guides are different.

 

A wedge relies on... wedging the chain tightly against the guides. It must be hammered down tightly and the crankshaft must not move or it dislodges. The plastic tool slips down and blocks the tensioner from pushing out when the chain tension is released.

 

I've heard that a folded garden hose jammed down tightly will also work.

 

 

 

 

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Get a wooden coat hanger and snap it half. They are mostly two pieces glued together anyway. It is the exact shape you want and usually made out of a hardwood. Depending on the hanger you get you may have to trim the small end a bit shorter. I have a few lying around I will see if I can dig one out for exact dimensions and picture. This is the hanger type I am talking about:

 

hanger.jpg

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33 minutes ago, Logical1 said:

Get a wooden coat hanger and snap it half. They are mostly two pieces glued together anyway. It is the exact shape you want and usually made out of a hardwood. Depending on the hanger you get you may have to trim the small end a bit shorter. I have a few lying around I will see if I can dig one out for exact dimensions and picture. This is the hanger type I am talking about:

 

hanger.jpg

 

I believe the long and slim wedge is for the L series engines.

 

I have ordered this for my Z24 hope it does the job, I considered using garden hose as many members suggested but I'm not that confident.

 

196700400_ScreenShot2022-02-23at2_28_59PM.thumb.png.343d90a07f818b1affaffab45d5115fc.png

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22 hours ago, Logical1 said:

I could not agree more! if you dont have an engine hoist, two people can manage it easy. I have done it with both manifolds on by myself, but it is heavy! let the tools do the work! 

 

I thought it would be a lot simpler job to unbolt both manifolds? Especially the intake since there are tons of diff hoses and wires off the carb. Half a dozen bolts each side to remove both manifolds then the cam gear and lift it out? 

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Well I have done over a dozen head gaskets on the Z series engines in 720 trucks and A10 cars. I never felt the need to pull the intake/exhaust. However that might be a different story in your van. If you have the clearance and a buddy just lift the whole thing off. As for your timing chain wedge, I have used that exact one before and I hated it. Not only is it way too soft of material, that silly little pull-line rips right out and you have to get in the timing cover with a pair of pliers and wrestle it out. The coat hanger you can drill a hole in and put some decent strength line through.

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I use a 5/8" heater hose with a steel slug stuffed inside of it. You could use wood or aluminum or whatever. The slug makes it solid so it won't crush, and being long and skinny, you can stuff it down the timing chain all the way to the oiler or lower timing gear, making it near impossible to loose the tensioner.

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On 2/23/2022 at 2:53 PM, Logical1 said:

Well I have done over a dozen head gaskets on the Z series engines in 720 trucks and A10 cars. I never felt the need to pull the intake/exhaust. However that might be a different story in your van. If you have the clearance and a buddy just lift the whole thing off. As for your timing chain wedge, I have used that exact one before and I hated it. Not only is it way too soft of material, that silly little pull-line rips right out and you have to get in the timing cover with a pair of pliers and wrestle it out. The coat hanger you can drill a hole in and put some decent strength line through.

 

I was planning to unbolt both the intake/exhaust manifolds with carby and everything intact, then just lift the head out and take it to a machine shop for inspection/re-conditioning. I doubt there will be enough clearance or man power to lift the whole thing off.

 

Yeah don't usually like plastic tools just I'm confused about the size and shape, the coat hanger resembles more the tool used on the L series engines? 

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9 minutes ago, richURVAN said:

the coat hanger resembles more the tool used on the L series engines? 

This is true. However, like I mentioned just trim the longer part a bit shorter. When you take you valve cover off and test it for fitment you will know what length it should be. The heater hose with a rod in it works great also. Once you get into it, you will figure out which way works best for you. I have been following this thread as I am VERY curious how the z engines over heat so badly in the van you have. My 85' 720 with a Z24, replacement radiator, & electric fan conversion runs almost too cold!

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The Vanette was designed for a smaller engine, maybe Z18 or Z20, but for N America, in order to keep up with traffic and what the consumer expects, (power steering, air con) the larger Z24 was put in. Keep in mind this is a mid engine application tightly enclosed and sound and heat insulated between and behind the two front seats with a flat floor across the front. Radiator is also stuffed into this space.

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On 2/28/2022 at 5:51 PM, Logical1 said:

This is true. However, like I mentioned just trim the longer part a bit shorter. When you take you valve cover off and test it for fitment you will know what length it should be. The heater hose with a rod in it works great also. Once you get into it, you will figure out which way works best for you. I have been following this thread as I am VERY curious how the z engines over heat so badly in the van you have. My 85' 720 with a Z24, replacement radiator, & electric fan conversion runs almost too cold!

 

Yeah I reckon Mike is onto something, hot air can't really escape in stand still traffic as the cabin is (insulated) and above the engine bay. There is a heat shield on the exhaust manifold with an air duct to vent in the side wing but I don't know how effective that is, seemingly not very. 

 

If you could dig out the rough dimensions on that coat hanger wedge buddy that would be handy, although your prob right it'll all come together once I take it apart. Hopefully doing it with a buddy this weekend. I've still got a tiny doubt in my mind it could be just trapped air still, might try one last time bleeding the system again (diff method). 

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Some of the older Land Cruisers have an electric fan which sucks hot air out of the engine bay and shoots it out of the fender. It is controlled by a thermostat and runs almost the entire time the truck is up to temp, and then runs on after the engine is shut down.

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That is an excellent idea!!!!

 

The '81-'83 280zx had a small fan on the lower right side of the engine with plastic duct work draped over the valve cover to blow cooling air over the fuel injectors.

 

 

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Peel the HG off and look on the under side.

 

 

The rusty crap in the cooling system is from not running a good quality antifreeze/coolant and changing it every 3? years as you are supposed to do. (not you, the previous owner) There are cooling system flushes you can buy. Often just remove the thermostat and the brass plug on the side of the block above the starter and stick a garden hose in and flush it out. 

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22 hours ago, datzenmike said:

Peel the HG off and look on the under side.

 

 

The rusty crap in the cooling system is from not running a good quality antifreeze/coolant and changing it every 3? years as you are supposed to do. (not you, the previous owner) There are cooling system flushes you can buy. Often just remove the thermostat and the brass plug on the side of the block above the starter and stick a garden hose in and flush it out. 

 

Ah Bro I've flushed the system every which way with a high pressure hose. I'll post pics of the headgasket peeled off later it's pretty intact, only a few spots where I think there could of been some leakage. 

 

Not sure how to remove all this gunk in the waterways and if that's the sole reason for the over-heating. 

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