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1990 Nissan 300zx ticking in the motor and low oil pressure


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I just bought a 300zx non turbo (2+2) off a lot for a good deal. I have a 1984 50th year 300zx model as well. I’ve owned her for a few days now and randomly it started to tick randomly. So I started investigating and took it on a little drive through my neighborhood. I looked down to check my speed and realized the oil pressure was running around 0 at idle then when I start going about 20mph the pressure rises to around 10-20. From my previous projects ive had problems somewhat like it where my pressure is low and there is a somewhat tick and came out to be my oil pump. I was recommended this forum from a friend who owns a mechanic shop in Seattle. Is there anyone who can help me troubleshoot this problem? 

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Welcome.

Have you checked the oil since you purchased the car? 

May seem like a dumb question, but I recently picked up a G35 cheap because the seller and buyer both neglected to check the oil. 

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4 hours ago, J-surdyk said:

I just bought a 300zx non turbo (2+2) off a lot for a good deal. I have a 1984 50th year 300zx model as well. I’ve owned her for a few days now and randomly it started to tick randomly. So I started investigating and took it on a little drive through my neighborhood. I looked down to check my speed and realized the oil pressure was running around 0 at idle then when I start going about 20mph the pressure rises to around 10-20. From my previous projects ive had problems somewhat like it where my pressure is low and there is a somewhat tick and came out to be my oil pump. I was recommended this forum from a friend who owns a mechanic shop in Seattle. Is there anyone who can help me troubleshoot this problem? 


i used to own a 92 twin turbo for many years. First the gauges in these cars are utter shit. Get a mechanical oil pressure gauge hooked up, go for a drive and see what it reads. Just disconnect the factory sender and plumb in a diagnostic gauge. 
 

second, the lifters are notorious for getting clogged up and ticking like crazy. Some people mix some atf in the oil and flush it several times. Get a stethoscope and pinpoint where the sound is coming from. If low oil, or oil pressure could be causing a lifter tick.

 

be mindful of the last time the car had the timing belt done, either 60k or 120k service. Check for a timing belt sticker, if you don’t see one, time to do the belt service.

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Okok, imma get on this tomorrow. Thanks for the reply. I’m about to build it into something way different but before I spend a lot of money on the motor (dumb stuff lmao) I wanna get everything going perfect 

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The first 240z were out in 1970 so a 50th anniversary edition would be 2020. I guess you mean 14th?

 

Change the oil and filter first thing. Find the owner's manual and use the correct weight oil for it. What does the old oil look like???

 

Does the red low oil pressure light come on??? Probably not as that happens below about 8 PSI so that's good at least. Get a real gauge. Idle should be over 20 and higher the better. Over 2,000 should be 55-65 PSI.

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19 hours ago, J-surdyk said:

  I have a 1984 50th year 300zx model as well.

 

Can only go by what is written. Change the oil and filter first. Could be contaminated.

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