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New at engine rebuild L16


Richie

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well in the Z car section  of that website they had the trans ones and I would assume they the same.  ASSUME!!!

 

my mistake its the dowel pin for alighnment

 Maybe a copper pipe will work. or good hardware store might have these

Edited by banzai510(hainz)
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Hey. So I have zero crank shaft end play. I did as the book said push it all the way forward with a flat head but it won’t move at all. Is thus bad that I have zero end play?

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32 minutes ago, datzenmike said:

Maybe it was already all the way forward. Try prying in backwards first.

So I measured the old bearing to the new bearing with a micrometer and the new one is barley bigger. So I guess 320 grit flat surface and sand the new bearing down .0001. 

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d8p19a4-8b9b6558-6432-4897-95e6-f34272fd

 

 

The old bearing is worn so it will be smaller than a new one. Do you grind new tires down because the old ones don't have tread on them????

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4 hours ago, datzenmike said:

d8p19a4-8b9b6558-6432-4897-95e6-f34272fd

 

 

The old bearing is worn so it will be smaller than a new one. Do you grind new tires down because the old ones don't have tread on them????

To be honest I realized that like 20 mins after I posted that. Yea that was dumb 

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react_haha.png I was wondering how you would remove 0.0001" with 320 paper. Newspaper is 40 times thicker than that.

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I check crankshaft end play with a dial indicator on a magnetic base. I don't use feeler gauges, as they can be misleading, but if that's what you've got, then go for it.

 

.006" is ideal, and remember to only sand the front side of the bearing. No sense in removing material from the thrust side of the bearing.

 

To check thrust clearance (end play), install the crank with oil on the bearing surfaces, but not on the thrust surface. Drop in the center main cap only and seat it to the block, but do not tighten the bolts. Using a dead blow hammer, knock the crank forward in the block, then tighten the center main cap bolts. Spin the crank to make sure it's not bound up, then take your measurement.

 

You can also wedge a large flat screwdriver between the back of the block and the crank counterweight to push the thrust bearing forward.

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On 4/11/2021 at 10:18 AM, datzenmike said:

Maybe it was already all the way forward. Try prying in backwards first.

So I pried the crank all the way forward and measured a .002 feeler gauge in between it. It fit fine. Just want to make sure I did this correctly. 
 

https://imgur.com/a/mceoqcH

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8 minutes ago, Richie said:

So I pried the crank all the way forward and measured a .002 feeler gauge in between it. It fit fine. Just want to make sure I did this correctly. 
 

https://imgur.com/a/mceoqcH

Minimum gap is important but you really don’t want too large of a gap. Check with a feeler gauge that’s bigger than the spec, if it fits, it’s not good.

 

As mentioned a dial indicator is a great way to measure this but feeler gauges should be ok if that’s all you’ve got. Harbor freight sells dial indicators. 

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If you didn’t already, pull the block vent screen and make sure it’s clean.

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I never sit at the lights with the clutch down. Slip into neutral as you stop. Anyone can see when the light is going to turn green and be ready for it.

 

I never start in gear with the clutch down. Engine starts in neutral with no push forward on the crank by the pressure plats.

 

 

I think you can also carve a very small groove in the top? bearing shell forward into the oil groove to provide direct oiling to the thrust surface. (this seems like a bit much for a regular street car)The rear thrust side does have two very large grooves to allow extra splash oiling.

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12 minutes ago, Draker said:

If you didn’t already, pull the block vent screen and make sure it’s clean.

I just bought a new one from Zcardepot. I bought the dial indicator like you said. And got the play .002 - .003 inches. I just wanted to be sure with both types of measuring ways. 

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.002-.003 is not enough. You need to get that clearance up to .006". As mentioned, too much clearance can cause the oil pressure to drop, so be sure not to go more than .006".

 

Sand the front side of the bearing ONLY. Use some 240 grit emery cloth and lube it with WD40 while sanding on a flat surface, like a piece of glass.

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Not everyone would, or would have the where withal to check this clearance.  How many home builds are just replacement of main and rod bearings and no thought to clearances, why would you? How would a new thrust bearing be too tight?? The crank and old bearing would be within speck when originally built and now perhaps slightly worn so how is this?

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How many home builds blow up or never run right in the first place? How many home builders use factory supplied OEM bearings? Aftermarket bearings are supposed to be built to the correct spec, but standards vary between manufacturers, and even mistakes are possible.

 

It is not uncommon for bearings to be too tight and sometimes so tight that the crank won't even spin. Checking and adjusting is not the end of the world.

 

Again, Mike with the questioning reality.

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My reality is I have never seen this, ever. Maybe I just was lucky? or bought quality bearings. This is like drilling and taping the oil gallery plugs. Never ever heard of one coming out or leaking. They never do. But it's great for cleaning it out.

 

L series crankshaft end play is 0.002" to 0.0071" so he is within spec. anyway.

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Within spec is good. Leave it  where it's at then.

 

Some bearings have oversize thrust. Besides that I always check everything when assembling a mechanical part. You never know what you may find. So yes, you've gotten lucky.

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12 hours ago, Stoffregen Motorsports said:

Within spec is good. Leave it  where it's at then.

 

Some bearings have oversize thrust. Besides that I always check everything when assembling a mechanical part. You never know what you may find. So yes, you've gotten lucky.

It took me about 3 hours of measuring and sanding. So it wasn’t luck like I got it out of the box. I read the book you guys recommended. I wish it was plug and play but I understand there is a lot of moving parts and don’t want to rely on luck. If it wasn’t for bad luck I wouldn’t have any luck at all. 

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It's ironic how the more you know about a particular thing, the more there is to worry about.

 

A favorite quote of mine is from my old boss Dave Rebello. He said once, when we were talking about the stock rod race motors he and Rick Freeman built for dirt track racing, and they would run them up to 10K regularly - "that was before we knew we couldn't spin them to 10K rpm."

 

Ignorance is bliss.

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So i bought an oil pressure relief valve because I got my engine back and it was missing. I bought one off of Zcardepot. I have no idea how to install it. Do i just hammer it in with all my force and hope for the best? (im joking)

 

https://zcardepot.com/collections/engine-rebuild/products/oil-pressure-relief-valve-oem-240z-260z-280z-510?_pos=5&_sid=36d7d04b3&_ss=r

 

Thank you. 

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I imagine put a socket over it and hammer in till flat. Only needed if you don't change your filter and it plugs up. I imaging a race engine is taped and plugged.

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