Jump to content

New at engine rebuild L16


Richie

Recommended Posts

19 minutes ago, Figbuck said:

Something that caused me issues was the Oil Pressure Sender. I wish I would have bought a new sender unit for my Auto-Meter oil pressure gauge... and made sure the threads in the block were the right ones... or else, tapped new threads before I "boiled" the block clean. The stock idiot light has a different thread pitch than most of the sending units. I know there are a ton of little things to remember and do, but this item can save you grief just as you want to get finished and fire it off!

 

 

 

Yes a stock sender is a bspt thread, most aftermarket gauges are npt.... you can chase a bspt thread with the equivalent size npt tap and make good threads...

I'm pretty sure they sell an adapter too... 

Edited by Crashtd420
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
  • Replies 230
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

1 hour ago, datzenmike said:

 Look under Hot Tank

 

https://www.enginerepairshop.com/cleaning-engine-parts.html

 

Caustic soda, Sodium hydroxide or lye are the same thing and what's in drano

Drano it is then. Thank you. Now I’m kind of curious on what causes these knicks in these two bearings from the crankshaft. Any ideas?

https://imgur.com/a/jZuvVXA

Link to post

sVwzOnG.jpg

 

blueprint-series-the-thrust-bearing-and-

 

That's the thrust bearing. It supports the crankshaft from moving forward and back. The two notches arr to allow oiling of the rear (and often the front too) surfaces

 

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
6 minutes ago, datzenmike said:

sVwzOnG.jpg

 

blueprint-series-the-thrust-bearing-and-

 

That's the thrust bearing. It supports the crankshaft from moving forward and back. The two notches arr to allow oiling of the rear (and often the front too) surfaces

 

 

Thanks you for that. See I got a lot to learn...

Link to post

For washing the block, solvent will clean the residue and the oil galleys. But then you need to get the solvent off for paint to stick. I use a spray bottle and https://www.amazon.com/4320P-Industrial-Strength-Cleaner-Degreaser/dp/B002HU5N4O to clean the oily residue, followed by a spray application of https://www.amazon.com/Krud-Kutter-ME326-Bottle-Translucent/dp/B001H1JNAY to get the metal ready for paint. Both of these chemicals need to be hosed off and dried. As far as flash rust, there's nothing you can do about it, so don't worry about it. The only flash rust that causes a problem (for paint) is flash rust that is allowed to go unpainted for weeks or more.

 

Going against my normal advice, I would suggest leaving the core plugs in the block. If they don't appear to be leaking, why remove them and introduce the possibility of getting the new ones installed improperly.

 

The oil galley plugs, I would definitely remove them. Junk builds up at the ends of the oil galley and only removing them can give you access to clean it out. I use a long bottle brush to clean the oil galleys. Removing them gets tricky, so let me know if you want to remove them so I don't wast time explaining it.

 

New plugs can be purchased at any machine shop. A quick online search found these - http://datnissparts.com/set-of-2-oil-gallery-plugs-datsun-nissan-l4-l6-naps-z-many-more-engines-11024-k0100/

Edited by Stoffregen Motorsports
  • Thanks 1
Link to post

Yes, but I use an old spring retainer with the bolt going through it into the plug, which allows the plug to pull out into the cavity of the spring retainer.

 

A socket with the bolt through it can do the same thing.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post

Dont worry about the second oil hole it's just facing the cap, pretty sure I'm right on that... just make sure when you assemble the motor you put the hole over the oil opening in the journals....

Maybe the 2 holes were just incase it got screwed up at the factory because you're working fast..... if you gave the employee holes in both bearing halves you would never have a failure due to not paying attention...... just my guess....

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
18 minutes ago, Crashtd420 said:

Dont worry about the second oil hole it's just facing the cap, pretty sure I'm right on that... just make sure when you assemble the motor you put the hole over the oil opening in the journals....

Maybe the 2 holes were just incase it got screwed up at the factory because you're working fast..... if you gave the employee holes in both bearing halves you would never have a failure due to not paying attention...... just my guess....

 

What about the grove on the thrust bearing? And have you ever heard of DNJ and ITM? Are they good brands?

Link to post

OOhuChY.jpg

 

Oil is forced down into the crank from above the top of all the main bearings. So the shell with the hole has to be toward the top of the engine and not on the lower main cap. The groove is just to help spread the oil around. On a racing engine it's common to buy two sets and just use the tops with the groove.

 

 

ebSvdVM.jpg

 

Rod bearings get their oil from the crankshaft which is drilled diagonally into the main bearing beside it. The hole has to be towards the piston as the rod is drilled to squirt oil upwards to lube the cylinder wall and piston pin. Probably rod bearings all have holes so you can't make a mistake.

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
26 minutes ago, datzenmike said:

OOhuChY.jpg

 

Oil is forced down into the crank from above the top of all the main bearings. So the shell with the hole has to be toward the top of the engine and not on the lower main cap. The groove is just to help spread the oil around. On a racing engine it's common to buy two sets and just use the tops with the groove.

 

 

ebSvdVM.jpg

 

Rod bearings get their oil from the crankshaft which is drilled diagonally into the main bearing beside it. The hole has to be towards the piston as the rod is drilled to squirt oil upwards to lube the cylinder wall and piston pin. Probably rod bearings all have holes so you can't make a mistake.

 

Thank you! I was like damn wrong parts gotta wait even longer. So my next question is there crankshaft bearing with one big hole and one tiny one different from the rest. Where would that one be placed? A similar one came off the engine when I was taking it apart. 

Link to post

Having said all this.... Last fall like over a year ago I threw a set of rod and main bearing in and old Z24 I had laying around, and now dammit I wonder if I paid enough attention to this. Well I will cost me a pan gasket to find out but better safe that...

Link to post
3 minutes ago, Richie said:

Thank you! I was like damn wrong parts gotta wait even longer. So my next question is there crankshaft bearing with one big hole and one tiny one different from the rest. Where would that one be placed? A similar one came off the engine when I was taking it apart. 

 

Better post a picture of them.

Link to post
35 minutes ago, Richie said:

Thank you! I was like damn wrong parts gotta wait even longer. So my next question is there crankshaft bearing with one big hole and one tiny one different from the rest. Where would that one be placed? A similar one came off the engine when I was taking it apart. 

I think the journal at the front of the motor uses it ..... I believe it feed the chain oiler on the front of the block....

Picture kind of sucks but you can see the extra hole in the front bearing shell...

You should see the extra hole on the block.... 

Screenshot_20210109-214100_Gallery.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
9 minutes ago, Crashtd420 said:

I think the journal at the front of the motor uses it ..... I believe it feed the chain oiler on the front of the block....

Picture kind of sucks but you can see the extra hole in the front bearing shell...

You should see the extra hole on the block.... 

Screenshot_20210109-214100_Gallery.jpg

Yes exactly that. Thank you. 
 

https://imgur.com/a/WodSoVj

Link to post

That does make sense as the oil to the mains comes downward on and angle from the oil gallery just above the level of the oil filter. The oil jet for the oil pump/distributor gear is above and to the manifold side of the crankshaft center line so there is probably a vertical hole then a horizontal hole it to meet it.

 

The oil feed to the chain tensioner is far enough over it may get it's oil from the supply to the front main.

 

V4gFyD8.jpg

 

If you look at the tensioner and just up and slightly right in the picture you can see the gallery plug. A diagonal line to the top of the front main goes right behind the tensioner.

 

The chain oiler is actually a small hole in the very front cam tower that shoots onto the chain..

 

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post

The main bearing have two skinny ones and two wide ones and one center thrust bearing. It should be obvious which ones get the narrow and which ones get the wide bearings.

 

I drill the #2 and #4 oil feed holes (in the bearings and in the block) to 1/4". This provides more oil to the rod bearings, which is a weak point in the L series. If you do this, be sure to chamfer the holes you drilled to remove the sharp burrs.

 

Also, run a piece of emery cloth over all the main bearing saddles to remove the sharp edges. Those sharp edges can scratch the backside of the bearing upon installation and cause a raised area under the bearing, which messes with the bearing clearances.

 

When checking bearing clearances, if you need to tighten them up a tad, you can do this by sanding the mating surface of the main caps. With emery cloth on a very flat surface.

 

Setting the thrust clearance is important too. With the bearings installed, set the crank into the block and install the center main cap with the bolts finger tight. Using a soft hammer, tap the crank forward to seat the rear thrust surface. Using feeler gauges or a dial indicator, check the thrust. You should have at least .006" of thrust clearance. If you don't have enough thrust, you can sand the FRONT SIDE of the thrust bearings to get the proper measurement.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎1‎/‎10‎/‎2021 at 1:05 PM, Stoffregen Motorsports said:

 

I drill the #2 and #4 oil feed holes (in the bearings and in the block) to 1/4". This provides more oil to the rod bearings, which is a weak point in the L series. If you do this, be sure to chamfer the holes you drilled to remove the sharp burrs.

 

 

Did you still cross drill # 2 & 4 crank journals?

 

Any experience with after market cranks like Moldex or Callies?

 

Thnx Stof!

Link to post

No, the only thing I do to the crank is chamfer the oiling holes, like an eye shape chamfer, smoothed out with a cartridge roll on a die grinder/porting tool.

 

Used plenty of billet cranks, mostly from Scat, but on an L series, you don't need one. L16/L18/L20B cranks are fully counterweighted already, so they have that going for them. The steel used in them is superior too. If rules allow, knife edging the counterweights is beneficial. Heat/cryo treat, shot peening, nitriding and metal-lax (ultrasonic) are all good too. It can get expensive though. Nitriding can grow the crank journals by a couple tenths of a thou, and that actually helps, but needs to be accounted for.

 

We used to weld on counterweights to the KA24 cranks.

Edited by Stoffregen Motorsports
Link to post

Stof, that was for race motors? Should have been a little clearer. The big gig in the 70s was to cross drill. My only experience is with the U20 then. Talking with Tilton in the day that was the way to go and of course enlarging the oil feed. We even enlarged the main oil gallery among other things. That crank was hard sht, had to use cobalt drills. Could spin that bitch to 8500 consistently 9K if needed. Telltale tachs don't lie, especially when the driver cant get to the reset button!

Link to post
On 1/19/2021 at 6:19 PM, docbainey said:

Stof, that was for race motors? Should have been a little clearer. The big gig in the 70s was to cross drill. My only experience is with the U20 then. Talking with Tilton in the day that was the way to go and of course enlarging the oil feed. We even enlarged the main oil gallery among other things. That crank was hard sht, had to use cobalt drills. Could spin that bitch to 8500 consistently 9K if needed. Telltale tachs don't lie, especially when the driver cant get to the reset button!

4cyl L series cranks are drilled so that the #2 and #4 mains feed all the rods, hence drilling only those feed passages in the block and bearings.

 

I love the Harry Hogge telltale tach scene in Days of Thunder...

Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.