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530-521

Timing chain ?

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If there's oily dirt it will have to be removed for any chance to see anything. Power wash the engine, wear boots googles and rain gear and go to town. Spray around the distributor base but not directly at it or the alternator or carburetor. Let dry over night and inspect. You may notice missed areas so do over. Took 3 or 4 times to get my L20B close to clean but if anything was to start leaking I would see it right away. 

 

Have you seen coolant or is it that you just know that it has to be leaking somewhere???? 

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I saw coolant, around the water pump mounting surface, and it was hitting the ground

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Could be as simple as a new water pump gasket, could also be the seal is gone and it needs replacing.

 

Could be the top rad hose or the thermostat housing dripping down Could be the by pass hose running from the thermostat housing down across the front of the engine to the lower rad hose inlet to the water pump. It's a metal pipe but water runs down hill.

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You are not a pain in the ass.  Remember the only stupid question is the one not asked.  These guys are knowledgeable and are trying to help you to get it done without needless work and expense.  Yo have five of the best people on Ratsun helping you, Hainz the "L' Motor God, Wayno who does all of his own work, Datzenmike the encyclopedia on Datsuns, and Draker another person that does all of his own repairs, and Crashtd420 is also knowledgeable in the art of Datsuns and does put out great experienced information and has an uncanny knowledge of the 521s. Not in any certain order.  Combined in these 5 people you have well over a hundred years of Datsun experience helping you!  Amazing when you think about it!  And guys I am not calling you all old farts as that is my title!  LOL

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I do like sharing what I've learned..... 

I've owned my 521 for 16 years now and love doing my own work on it.. 

 

I just wish I new about ratsun sooner... it would have made things easier in the beginning.....

I've learned of things here I would never have thought about asking or thought about doing...... 

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Well guys- I really appreciate it. Glad to have you guys along for the adventure.

 

So- I shortened the thermostat housing bolt, and tried to bend the tension guide back. It did move some, but it is still curved looking down on it..

 

its better, should I run it for now?

 

qGAknPu.jpg

 

c6nXBN4.jpg

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The only picture of our L20-b build showing the end of the chain guide near the mention thermostat bolt isn't too clear but I think you can see a small gap of clearance.

 

40735970850_c452cb0259.jpg

 

If you can zoom in on the picture I posted you can see the rubber lining as well on the chain guides. Looks like yours is worn away due to the long bolt issue.

Edited by sondat
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Zooming in on your picture I see some clearance to the guide, I'd give it a go myself.

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What about this windage tray inside the valve cover? It has some kind of sealant over the screws that was cracked and falling off. I chipped it all off and took all the screws out and cleaned it all up.. Should I locktite the screws in??CqLPpWP.jpg

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Anything else I need to know about putting the valve cover on? Torque specs?

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I see no problem using locktite on the those screws....

I cleaned up mine but never removed it...

 

And there is nothing special needed to do on the valve cover....

I just tighten by hand.... 

I think torque specs would be about 10ftlbs.... 

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Most definitely keep that tray in place. It prevents spray from the cam and oil fog from getting to the vent hose above it

 

Valve cover bolts are around 5 ft. lbs. Better too light than strip the threads. I hold ratchet as close to the center as I can and just wrist tighten. The gasket will compress over time so check in a few days and if loose or leaking add a bit more. This way you can re-use it several times rather than compressing it all at once.

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Thanks guys. I’ll let you know how it goes when I can take her for a drive later this week.

 

John

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I agree, you can over tighten them and get on trouble, I do the same thing as Mike, use my wrist to tighten them rather than the handle, same with the oil pan but even less pressure.

Pulling apart everything apart can get you in trouble, only remove what you need to remove, I have owned my Datsun 521 work truck for almost 25 years and I have never given that shield in the valve cover a second look, I have never removed one.

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I thought they were riveted in place....

 

...and it's always easier to take stuff apart. Not so easy or fast to put back together. Sometimes an adjustment is lost and needs resetting, like a carburetor, sometimes it takes 5 tries to get it back together correctly, then there are non reusable things like a seal or gasket that has to be replaced. Often you break something that was working just fine if it was only left alone. One of the most important things that often take so long to learn is... Don't fix what ain't broken and it's cousin...  leave shit alone.

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11 minutes ago, datzenmike said:

I thought they were riveted in place....

 

...and it's always easier to take stuff apart. Not so easy or fast to put back together. Sometimes an adjustment is lost and needs resetting, like a carburetor, sometimes it takes 5 tries to get it back together correctly, then there are non reusable things like a seal or gasket that has to be replaced. Often you break something that was working just fine if it was only left alone. One of the most important things that often take so long to learn is... Don't fix what ain't broken and it's cousin...  leave shit alone.

 

 

The only reason I took that shield off was because I looked on top of the motor and there was a piece of that crystallized sealant laying right behind #4’s valves... so I noticed where it came from, the valve cover shield. So I chipped The rest of it off, and cleaned it all up and the screws that held the shield too. Then I blue Loctited then back in. 

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Use blue 243, it’s more resistant to heat/oily environments (for future reference). It’s performance exceeds loctite 242.

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3 hours ago, datzenmike said:

Most definitely keep that tray in place. It prevents spray from the cam and oil fog from getting to the vent hose above it

 

Valve cover bolts are around 5 ft. lbs. Better too light than strip the threads. I hold ratchet as close to the center as I can and just wrist tighten. The gasket will compress over time so check in a few days and if loose or leaking add a bit more. This way you can re-use it several times rather than compressing it all at once.

 

Thanks for the torque correction I was thinking 10 because the oil pan bolts are the same size,but yes into aluminum would be less....

I don't think I've ever actually used a torque wrench on the valve cover always by feel for that... 

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the bolt is too long . its pushing the timming cahin guide inwards . bolt should be more flush. or ez way to ck it is loosen the bolt and see what the guide relax too.

 

 

I re read your post look like you shorted the bolt.  If you ever hear a grinding noise then youll know where it comes from. Most times those tight side guides never ear out

Edited by banzai510(hainz)
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Chain guides are adjustable, sort of, and correct chain guide geometry is crucial.

 

When installing them (curved guide, straight guide and even the tensioner), it is best to take some time and adjust them all to get the best fit, with no extreme points of contact and a smooth, flowing curve between the tensioner and curved guide. Sometimes, this means drilling the holes bigger or slotting them, with a file.

 

Aftermarket guides have been known to have a bad fit. Also, some aftermarket guides are made of thinner steel and not as durable.

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