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jetattblue

A Texas 320

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If considering the Toyota wheels, beware that the 87-94 trucks also had un-styled wheels, but the offset was different. It had more backspacing/positive offset.

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I was lucky enough to get a few hours working on the truck this weekend. Mostly, I am still slowly disassembling various engine parts so that removing the whole engine will be easier. I have been very fortunate that - despite a small amount of rust - the bolts are coming out and the parts are coming off with no issues. This weekend, I removed the generator, starter, thermostat housing, and the wiring to these parts. Interestingly, there was no thermostat inside the housing. It was completely gone.

 

My current goal is to get the engine removed, and lots of the parts in the engine bay; I would like to really clean up the engine bay and redo the wiring (which is a mess) and some of the hard lines running from the brake and clutch masters. Current pictures are below:

 

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Yesterday, I removed the engine, and it was much easier than I thought - thankfully. I had previously removed the generator and manifolds; but, I still have the valve cover and plugs in place because I was hoping to clean it up before I start rebuilding it. Does anyone have any suggestions for degreasing and cleaning it without getting water into the manifolds? I was planning to tape them off, but I'd love to hear any additional suggestions.

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Put the intake and exhaust back on and power wash it. You could pre treat it with a de-greaser. Let dry then take a look at what you missed and do again. I've done my L20B in the car 3-4 times and every time I find more places I missed but slowly it's gotten better and better. Wear a rain coat and rubber boots and something to shield your eyes.

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Stuff a rag down each port and then cover with good masking tape (green or blue work well). Once engine is clean, remove the tape and rags, then the spark plugs and oil drain plug. Wash cylinders down with WD40 and turn it over a few times. Water is not so bad, as long as you don't let it sit inside the engine.

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Justin, I've developed an affection for 'Gunk Gel' engine cleaner for old baked on or caked up crud removal. Costs a little more than the other Gunks, but well worth it. Spray a coat on and let it set bout 15 min. scrape around the thick deposits and wire brush a little, spray on another coat of Gunk Gel, and pressure wash or make a run to the car wash.  I could almost cuddle up with the E1, the 320 transmission, and the 620 5-Speed in the Sunday-Go-To-Meetin' clothes after that little process. This 320 floor-shift trany was pretty caked up on the top half before that little fire-drill.

 

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Edited by difrangia
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Everyone's got their own formulas but I like Simple Green, steel wool, and scotch brite pads. And for the really bad stuff a wire brush on a 4" grinder. 

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My goal is to try to keep things moving - even when I do not have a ton of time. So, I pick out various smaller projects and try to tackle those. They end up being tasks that I can do without getting too involved, and that I can walk away from and come back to as time allows. One of these tasks was cleaning up and rebuilding the fuel pump. As you can see from the pictures it was pretty dirty, and the internals were completely blown. Despite moving the arm, it would not draw in or expel anything. After taking it apart and thoroughly cleaning it up, I sanded the mating surfaces to true them up, replaced the diaphragm and valves, and re-assembled it. It's working great now!

 

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One thing I try to avoid when cleaning old car parts, is over cleaning. I like a part to be clean, but retain some of its patina. If it's a bare aluminum part, I use the chemical bath, then a pressure wash, then a brass brush to get all the grit and scale off. That way, you preserve the character without the "wire wheeled" look.

 

Looks like you've got the cleaning process down. That fuel pump looks great.

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I totally agree! I only used a brass brush and simple green. I don't really use anything mechanical for stuff like this; it was all hand scrubbed.

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If you have access to a blasting cabinet, using glass beads and very low pressure can sometimes speed things up. If you hold the gun far away, you can remove the scale without damaging the cast look or electroplating. This process works great with bare aluminum parts, fasteners, even internal engine parts.

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Good job on that fuel pump. If you need new valves, they're available from this Nissan supplier in Oklahoma City.

 

https://www.group1autoparts.com/oem-parts/nissan-valve-17065m0110          

 

Just keep plugging at that little pickup and you're payback will come later. It was year and a half from engine pull to the next drive on our 320 and I refurbished/updated almost every component except the rear axle and that is on the future project list. I plan on changing to 4:11 gearing for a little lower RPM - higher speed.

 

Kinda like eating an elephant. Ya know how to do that don't ya ?? 

 

One bite at a time.

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Thank you!

 

I intended to clean up the engine this week beginning with a power wash. But, I borrowed a power washer that has not been used in a very long time and, consequently, I spent most of the week getting it running. Long story short, gas had turned into lacquer and clogged lots of the little carb pieces. I finished cleaning it up just in time for a massive rain storm.

 

With the rain outside, I started cleaning up a floor shift specific starter that I sourced from Ted Heaton. Although operational, I wanted to clean it up before ultimately installing it. As you can see, it was in need of a thorough cleaning and check through all of the connection points.

 

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I did! And, I really appreciate it. Once I get the engine cleaned up, I'll make sure everything looks good with it, then I'll be able to put them to good use.

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I finished my starter project this morning. My work included: abating rust and repainting the cylinder/canister; cleaning up the aluminum parts; cleaning all of the internals with contact cleaner because they were in good shape - just filthy; lightly greasing the shaft that the gear slides on; and, replacing the solenoid. Let me say, it was surprisingly difficult to get back together! There are lots of pieces that seem to all fit together at once. In other words, I ended up starting to put several pieces loosely together, then they all tightened together at once. They also need to follow a sequence or you have to start over. Honestly, it took me many tries, but my technique improved each time. I got frustrated with it last night, but I slept on it, and I finally assembled it this morning. I also bench tested it and it worked great! The starter is finished and ready to install when I get to that point.

 

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They are kind of like a Chinese finger trap. Professional shops must use rubber bands and stuff to keep all the parts together during assembly.

 

Looks great.

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JJ, here's a link to brushes that work in that starter. I've put a set in the backup stash. Might find equivalent brushes in US for less $$ with a little searching. The ones in the Ebay listing are Lucas so 'Victoria Brittish' or 'Moss Motors' would have something Austin/Morris that would work. A good number of British parts will interchange with E and J series Datsun mechanical parts.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Datsun-1200-510-520-521-Starter-brushes-Japan-NEW/301903207304?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

 

The solenoid is a unit common to a gazillion foreign & domestic vehicles back in the 50-s - 70's. I have a brand and part number for the solenoid if you'd like it.

 

It's been three years or so since I rebuilt a couple of these and seems like I whipped up some clip thingie from paino wire laying around the shop to hold the brushes out for running the commutator back in; Something that could be pulled out when the commutator is part way into the brush area.

Edited by difrangia
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A Chinese finger trap very accurately described this process! I assembled it no less than four times before noticing that something wasn't working right or that I'd left something out. It was very frustrating, but rewarding in the end.

 

Thank you, Steve! I'll grab a couple of extras.

 

My next tasks are removing the transmission and fully disassembling the engine for clean up. One step at a time.

 

 

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I have now removed the cylinder head from the engine block. Here's an interesting find. As I removed the pushrods, I set them side by side on a rag as I wiped them off, and I noticed something. In the picture of them all lined up parallel, look at the 4th pushrod from the top. It has a slight bend. And, you can see in the closer up picture how it is worn where it bends out. Unfortunately, I failed to keep them in order, so I do not know what valve this corresponds to; but, I am guessing that a stuck valve caused this issue? There is lots of carbon buildup around all of the valves. Any other thoughts on what might cause this?

 

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I always remove stuff a certain way so I know where it goes back in, that way the valve clearance stays the same it was before, if you mix them up you have to adjust everything even if you don't remove the head.

If you need a push rod because you cannot get that one straight again message me as I likely have one in my parts box.

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Since I am a British car owner once again, I have been thinking about the parts interchangeability between these motors and BMC motors. I wonder if one of the aluminum MGB heads would bolt up to this block. They make the aluminum heads in crossflow too.

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