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jetattblue

Floor Pan Repair

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I have '63 L320 that I'm starting to work on. Repairing rust holes in the floor pans is one of my very first tasks.

 

First, am I correct that nobody sells replacement pans? I've searched but not seen anything.

 

Second, assuming that I have to fabricate replacements, how do you add the ridges or channels that are in the pans? I believe these are for rigidity, but I'm not sure how to cleanly do that without some sort of press that I will not have access to.

 

Finally, my truck's pans appear to be spot welded in. There is a thick edge around them that I am assuming indicates panel overlap.

 

I appreciate any insight you could give me. I'll see if I can get a picture posted, too. 

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See this thread, is is about my work on replacing the floor pans in a 521.  I know, you have a 320, but the principles are the same.  There is also a lot of comments from Ratsun member Wayno, he has done work on 320 trucks.

https://ratsun.net/topic/51593-floor-repair/

 

Ridges can be fabricated in a flat piece of sheet metal with a bead roller.

 

This is one source of metal fab tools and equipment.

https://www.eastwood.com/

Edited by DanielC
changed 620 to 320
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Yep, a bead roller with different size and shape dies will be able to recreate just about any original contours in the sheetmetal. You can get a manual roller for little money, but one with an electric motor makes the job so much easier. Sometimes it's a two person job, depending on the size of the sheet.

 

Also, the early sheetmetal is a lot thicker than late model cars/trucks. Probably close to 16ga. A bead roller that can shape 16ga steel is going to be more expensive. I can do 16ga on my Mittler Brothers roller, but it really stresses the machine.

 

I'm sure you could find a fab shop in your area to make a patch panel for you. Then you wouldn't have to spend $1500 on a bead roller.

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https://www.trick-tools.com/

 

https://lowbucktools.com/

 

https://www.grizzly.com/sheet-metal-machines

 

https://www.baileigh.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI8OOlhuWY4QIVQhx9Ch1IsgEoEAAYASAAEgI46_D_BwE

 

These are some good suppliers. Most "cheap" equipment on the market these days is simply rebranded and painted to the sellers specs, so if you find something you like in a name brand tool, you can likely get it for less by looking for an off brand seller. That goes for inexpensive tools. Once you get into more expensive tools, each brand is different.

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Thank you so much for the info!

 

How do you post pictures? I’d love to share what I’m trying to do.

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Here's one thread on posting images:

 

 

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