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510 rear drum brake adjuster disassembly?

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I am rebuilding the rear brakes on my '72 510 wagon and have the adjuster off the car and wanted to completely clean and rebuild.

 

Does the adjuster screw unscrew in through the body all the way to get it out as indicated in the diagram above? I have worked it loose, but cannot get it worked all the way out. Does it just unscrew or is there something hidden I am missing? I have the little piston things out and only have the adjuster screw to finish.

 

Thanks to all.

Edited by rosso

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It comes out in the direction it shows.  The head pushes against two pistons....one on either side.....they have to separate far enough to let the head of the adjuster pass between them.  It's 4 separate pieces if I remember right.  Soak it down with penetrating oil to get the pistons to free up....same with the threads on the adjuster.

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Then lube with anti seize paste.

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Since I already have the pistons out, and I soaked the adjuster with WD-40 and worked it in and out a lot - with it still not coming out through the bore, I guess I need a bigger wrench. ?

 

It's what I figured, but wanted to check here, thanks for the confirmation. I am picking up some Permatex copper anti-seize on my errands today and an assortment of small wire brushes from Harbor Freight.

 

Brake shoes ordered (AC Delco) and some Gempler's Rust Converter.

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9 hours ago, datzenmike said:

Then lube with anti seize paste.

 

YES!  The factory puts in them in dry...

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Thanks Dr510,

 

That's always the route of last resort - just thought it would be nice to completely disassemble to check the adjuster is not borked because of a frozen piston. And it is a bit hard to see inside the body even with the pistons out  If I can;'t get it apart after a bit more fiddling I will inspect to make sure there is full travel to push the pistons out and just reassemble as you suggest.

 

Michael

aka Rosso since my first 510 was red

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Any chance they're left hand thread and you're bottoming the adjuster out?  It's been a lot of years since I messed with one.  If there's threads sticking out the back, you should be able to tell by looking at it.

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I seem to remember turning clockwise from behind to spread the shoes. The dissimilar metals (aluminum and steel) tend to seize easily and the square shank used to turn them become rounded. You can weld a 12mm nut on the end and then use a ratchet. 

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15 hours ago, datzenmike said:

I seem to remember turning clockwise from behind to spread the shoes. The dissimilar metals (aluminum and steel) tend to seize easily and the square shank used to turn them become rounded. You can weld a 12mm nut on the end and then use a ratchet. 

 

I use a quarter inch drive socket set and a quarter inch Allen wrench.  Perfect fit and no rounding.  Invert the quarter inch socket and slip over the square end of the adjuster then use the Allen wrench to turn the shaft.

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I did find a combination that worked but only one side and it was already damaged. I have new wheel cylinders for it and will take the adjusters apart and weld nuts on them. They are already greased.

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18 hours ago, mklotz70 said:

Any chance they're left hand thread and you're bottoming the adjuster out?  It's been a lot of years since I messed with one.  If there's threads sticking out the back, you should be able to tell by looking at it.

No, looking at the adjuster from the back (like you would with it on the car) clockwise screws the adjuster to push the pistons out. With it out of the car and to remove the adjuster you would continue to screw clockwise to go all the way through the body. My adjuster is completely free but does not easily go all the way through the body.

 

datzenmike is correct - clockwise to spread the shoes. My adjuster is free so I have no need to weld a nut on it.

 

MikeRL411 suggestion of a socket also works but I used an adapter, 1/4" drive female to 3/8" drive male. A 10mm open end wrench fits the 3/8" end perfectly and is easy to turn.

 

Harbor Freight adapter set of 4 for $2.99 - so cheaper than a singe adapter and now I have other sizes to add to my tool set.

 

 

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If it's loose now it won't be next year. Brush some anti-seize paste on it while you can.

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You bet - when i I put it all back together I will.  What about putting a bit of lube on the backing plate where the brake shoes touch?

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4 hours ago, rosso said:

You bet - when i I put it all back together I will.  What about putting a bit of lube on the backing plate where the brake shoes touch?

 

Yes !

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On 8/24/2018 at 7:10 PM, mklotz70 said:

Any chance they're left hand thread and you're bottoming the adjuster out?  It's been a lot of years since I messed with one.  If there's threads sticking out the back, you should be able to tell by looking at it.

 

No, More likly you are topping out on the right hnd ipp pf the square juster,  Back of a slight bit and go to  the opposite wheel on that  axel.  Then go back always a good sugetion[ and ] retighten both wheel adjusters..  Kept my RL411 brakes well adjusted for 50 years using this approach.

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Lube sparingly on the raised touch points on the backing plate where the shoes rub. Both ends of the shoes where they contact the wheel cylinders and the adjusters. The star wheel (if equipped) and threads on the adjuster as well as the adjuster's sliding components.  Any parking brake* levers, cables or hardware.

 

NEVER use a petroleum based grease on any brake part. It will melt at high temperatures and drip or run. No WD-40 on the adjuster or rinse off with cleaner after.

NEVER allow any lubricant / grease to get on the friction linings.

Anti seize may use an oil product to hold the metal aluminum / copper powders in suspension so check.

 

I use white lithium grease but there are newer silicone brake 'greases' out there and they can be used on the front disc brakes that get much hotter.

 

 

*get your parking brake working and keep it working by using every time you stop other than in traffic. The cables will never rust if you use them constantly. Keep your parking brake adjusted. Next to the hydraulic brake system it is the most important safety device on your vehicle and the most ignored. If nothing else it allows you to stop and hold position with the engine running and out of gear. Stop using a brick, fix it and... USE IT!

 

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On 8/25/2018 at 2:36 PM, rosso said:

You bet - when i I put it all back together I will.  What about putting a bit of lube on the backing plate where the brake shoes touch?

YES and take the "pistons" out clean and lube!  You do not have to remove the adjusting screw/bolt, clean and lube.

Edited by Doctor510
Added info

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Hey datzenmike,

 

Which of these copper anti-sieze lubricants do you think is better? Or something else for the rear brake reassembly.

 

https://www.amazon.com/3M-08945-Copper-Seize-Brake/dp/B00HSCN9IS/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1535678248&sr=8-3&keywords=permatex+copper+anti-seize

 

https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-09128-Copper-Anti-Seize-Lubricant/dp/B000HBM8HU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1535694141&sr=8-1&keywords=permatex+copper+anti-seize

 

Thanks,

Michael

aka rosso because my first 510 was red

 

 

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 I don't think it will really matter. Just use a light coat on the threads. For all the other moving contact parts like the 'pistons' (called adjuster tappets) shoe ends, anti rattle springs, backing plate contacts with the shoes, parking brake lever/linkages and the wheel cylinders* (they clip in place but must be able to slide forward and back) I would use a white lithium chassis grease.

 

* There should be rubber dust covers for the back sides of the wheel cylinders. Be sure to keep and use them.

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