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Tom1200

H190 510 wagon axle end play; what parts wedge bearing in place?

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If you've seen my post on "handling still needs work" I may have found the issue.

 

Using a dial indicator and pushing / pulling the axle in and out there appears to be 6-8 thousands of play. Combine both sides and that's a 64th of an inch.

 

When I got the axle it was clear something is missing; with the backing plate torqued down to spec I could move the axle shaft 1-2mm. In order to cure this I put shims in the axle housing behind the bearing. Note that even taking all the backing plate shims still left to much slop.

 

On the axle there is the bearing and collar. In the housing there is the axle seal and nothing else (other than my non stock shims).

 

So my question is what is supposed to wedge the bearing in place; Is the bearing supposed to bottom in the housing (metal outer circumference of bearing against housing) and then the backing plate wedge the other side of the bearing?

 

From the schematics it appears I have missing parts. Most notable is no grease seal thingy. The bearings are sealed bearings so I'm to worried about that but as the H190 is different than the H145 that was in the cars for years, I don't no if said grease seal takes up some of the end play. There also appears as if there is supposed to be a spacer behind the bearing.

 

Any help or pictures would be greatly appreciated.

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What diff carrier are using? If you can get inside the carrier, maybe you could machine up a block that spaces out the axle shafts. Kind of like a c-clip carrier.

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It's an alloy 4.38 LSD 23 spline roadster unit in a 510 wagon housing.

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I guess your only option is to shim it up at the backing plate bearing retainer.

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So while checking the right side I found it had 15-20 thou, so add that to the left side and there may be as much as .75mm or 1/32", hell I make toe adjustments in 1/64th increments.

 

I still have a few shims in between the backing plate and housing, pulling those out would fix the left side but the right will definelty need to be shimmed. Worst case I can have my buddy machine up a few shims if need be.

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You might have really worn bearings.

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My 510 wagon had ball bearings, as do most Nissan car solid axle set-ups, including the Cedric, and Gloria H190s.

The only Nissans I've seen with tapered bearings are the trucks.

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The bearings make none of telltale sounds of worn bearings nor do they feel worn. I'll be checking them though when I pull the axles out to reshim them.

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I thought you set one side (doesn't matter which) to 0.3 to 0.9mm then go to the other side and set 0.02-0.15mm against it by adding or subtracting shims at the backing plate. If you can't set this side try setting the other. 

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Mike,

 

The set up is basically done that way but I've got over double that so pulling the shims from out behind the backing plate isn't likely to get me where I need to be.

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Did you try setting the opposite side first?

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Well how about replacing the thrust block? If it's worn maybe the axle ends are too???

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It's possible but I'm pretty sure it's purely case of shims. Whoever put this together originally did some goofy things, things like the brake shoes reversed (leading shoe trailing etc.)

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There is NO thrust block in the 510 wagon rear end, and the axles do not rest against the cross pin for the spider gears.

 

H190_Wagon-Roadster_Spline-3.JPG

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Ah, later H-190s do. Well that just leaves the shims. Then the shim set up may be different than I posted.

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