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emanistan

How do I get to those motherf*cking nuts to get the g*d-d*mned motherf*cking carburetor off?

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Cause it is a bolt not a screw.

Great minds think alike.

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Because you use Harbor Freight screwdrivers?

Damn right! I should take that screwdriver right back to HF & demand my money back because it's no good at removing bolts! 

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When you go to reinstall, get yourself an extendable magnet (bet you can get one at HF), it really helps when putting the nuts back on.

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What I did was set the washers and nuts on the carb base and carefully set the carb in place. When the studs come up through the washers fall down on and the nut sits on top. Then just reach in with fingertip and carefully spin it on. Not for the faint hearted. I also have a dental pick that you can spin them on with.

 

Had my L20B carb off 6 times last spring chasing a problem. Got pretty good at it.

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If I recall, there are only a couple that need started with the carb a bit elevated for clearance, but of course those are the hardest to see / access.  And while the carb is off is the time to make sure the stud threads are good and the nuts spin down by hand, and swap out any damaged nuts for good ones.  Stuff a rag or yogurt cup cap plug in the intake hole or Murphy's law will bite you in the ass.

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And please let us know what size the carb nuts actually are. I checked the ones on my F10 (with A14 engine) and they are 10mm. L-series are 12mm (or all the ones I've worked on). But maybe some A-series engines used 12mm. I'm curious.

 

In my opinion doing the nuts on an A-series (at least a smog control version) are much worse than an L-series since there is less room for fingers.. And L-series are really miserable. My hope is I'll never again need to install a carb on an A-series.

 

Len

 

 

 

 

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98% sure A motor carb nuts are 10mm. Gonna take a look when I get home.

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I have an A series intake manifold out in the garage, I just checked and it has 10mm bolts holes in it, I suppose it had studs at some point but they have been removed, so I spun a bolt in the hole(bolt with 10mm head on it).

10mm should be way easier to work with as the wrenches are small already, I have a couple really short 10mm wrenches.

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THANK YOU EVERYBODY!!!

 

26325381449_e8fc3f03be_z.jpg20171101_170756 by emanistan

 

38070694142_527b10dff0_z.jpg20171101_170544 by emanistan

 

You guys have now more than earned the right to insult my screwdrivers--and my manhood with them--all you want.  Folks have been wondering about the size of these motherf*cker nuts ever since I posted this topic.  The answer, at least for the ones on my car, is 10mm, though, as I said before, other people have obviously been in this engine compartment before, so there's no guarantee they're factory original. 

 

In the end, the fact that the nuts were so jacked up worked to my advantage: the gouges and spurs enabled me to get them off by placing a flathead screwdriver against them and getting them started by tapping the end with a small hammer, then working them out the rest of the way by hand.  This particular screwdriver didn't come from Harbor Freight; it was a JEGS brand one I bought as part of a set off Ebay last year.  That's probably why it worked.

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10mm! I stand vindicated!

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THANK YOU EVERYBODY!!!

26325381449_e8fc3f03be_z.jpg20171101_170756 by emanistan,

 

38070694142_527b10dff0_z.jpg20171101_170544 by emanistan,

 

You guys have now more than earned the right to insult my boltdrivers--and my manhood with them--all you want. Folks have been wondering about the size of these motherf*cker nuts ever since I posted this topic. The answer, at least for the ones on my car, is 10mm, though, as I said before, other people have obviously been in this engine compartment before, so there's no guarantee they're factory original.

 

In the end, the fact that the nuts were so jacked up worked to my advantage: the gouges and spurs enabled me to get them off by placing a flathead screwdriver against them and getting them started by tapping the end with a small hammer, then working them out the rest of the way by hand. This particular screwdriver didn't come from Harbor Freight; it was a JEGS brand one I bought as part of a set off Ebay last year. That's probably why it worked.

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HF tools are emergency 1 time use.

I use their screwdriver for digging weeds, but they rust after 1 season.

 

 

Custom tools rule!

I cut a wrench in 2

so if bending it heat it up first but dont hold it with your bare hands

 

Safety tip: hot metal and cold metal are the same color.

Safety meeting anyone?

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I bought a set of shorty metric wrenches many years ago that gets these fairly easy. The real answer is a different carb and eliminating all the emissions garbage.

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This may not be important but.....in the picture with the carb removed, you have 4 nuts laying in front of it, they are the wrong type.  Should be a plain nut and a lock washer.

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This may not be important but.....in the picture with the carb removed, you have 4 nuts laying in front of it, they are the wrong type.  Should be a plain nut and a lock washer.

Not at all surprising.

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Cut a 10mm wrench in half and tie a string to it to prevent losing it if dropped. Putting the nuts back on is just as bad. stuff something in back to catch dropped nuts. 

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Thanks everybody, especially the great Datzenmike.  You answered one thing I specifically forgot to ask: what size are those motherf*cking nuts?  since I can't even fit a caliper down there to size them, and the burrs on the edges would throw off the measurement anyway.  I think next week after payday I'll try my luck with a 1/12 box-end ratchet wrench with a flex handle.[/quote

] I know it's been several months since the last post on this, but did you ever figure out a good solution to removing the motherf**king nuts?

 

I have 3 B210's and ALL of mine have 10mm nuts on them. A 12mm would never fit on those carbs. The 10mm barely fits. I've had a ton of issues with my carbs over the years, so I could take those carbs off in my sleep. There is no need to remove the valve cover, overkill. Rep hoses

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Thanks everybody, especially the great Datzenmike. You answered one thing I specifically forgot to ask: what size are those motherf*cking nuts? since I can't even fit a caliper down there to size them, and the burrs on the edges would throw off the measurement anyway. I think next week after payday I'll try my luck with a 1/12 box-end ratchet wrench with a flex handle.

I know it's been several months since the last post on this, but did you ever figure out a good solution to removing the motherf**king nuts?

 

I have 3 B210's and ALL of mine have 10mm nuts on them. A 12mm would never fit on my carbs. The 10mm barely fits. I've had a ton of issues with my carbs over the years, so I could probably take those carbs off in my sleep. There is no need to remove the valve cover, overkill.

 

Once your air cleaner is off and ALL hoses are out of the way remove the top carb screw closest to firewall that holds the side bracket down. Remove the choke. Then remove the 2 back side screws holding the bracket on. Then remove the f**king screw and slip clip (pic below) at the end of that bracket that holds the throttle cable in place. That fucking screw is the bain of my existence! Grrr! Because, it's so hard to get back on.

 

20180409_142336_zpssp0fqlss.jpg

 

Then remove the throttle cable by cranking the throttle lever around and wiggling the cable out and away from the carb body.

Next remove the big flathead screw, 2 tiny washers, and the spring that holds the accelerator pump lever on. Then remove that accelerator pump lever bar.

At this point the goddamned nuts should be as accessible as they are going to get. A bent wrench or flexible head wrench would make things easier, but not at all necessary. If the nut is really rounded needle-nose vice-grip pliers might be your best friend here to get it loosened enough to then unscrew by hand. After you get those off, put on new nuts (obviously) with nylon threading because tightening the new nuts enough without striping them can be a pain in the arse too. The nylon helps keep them from vibrating loose.

 

Hope this helps anyone having this same problem.

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I use a cut in half 10mm and grind the sides of the wrench to increase the travel of each turn.  I remove the surrounding EGR, air filter and the rest.  I'll be able to access three of the nut fairly easily but the fourth one by the accelerator cable is the most difficul.

 

I stay patient and turn the nut a half a turn until its semi-tight.  then I'll cross tighten each nut.  BUT BEFORE I do all this I attach the accelerator cable.  I only start each nut 2 turns until they are all started.

 

I've removed and reinstalled carbs on my B210 maybe 10 times or more.  I muscle up my patience and wrench.

 

Its great to have the magnetic tool from HF and putting a string on the wrench is an awesome idea.  I lost one and never found it again.  Putting catch towels/rags around the carb is also a great idea. 

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Picture of my wrench with the sides ground off to increase travel of wrench. I threaded a piece of green yarn through a hole I drilled.  I lost a similar wrench two carburetors ago.

 

IMG_2652.jpg

 

IMG_2651.jpg

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