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1970datsun1600

ADVISEMENT - 1970 Datsun 1600 Roadster

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Hi everyone, I need help in this opportunity I have in buying a 1970 Datsun 1600 Roadster. The car has been sitting in the garage for a long time, without ever turning on. It seems the car does not have the original motor but I could be wrong. Additionally it looks like the top has been modified and does not fit properly. The tags are expired and last registered in Los Angeles, CA. It shows 61,000+ miles on the odometer. Inteior looks decent with some cosmetic damage and possible rust. I don't know anything about this type of car and if its worth restoring it.

 

My questions if you guys could help me with is, based on the pictures and the brief description, what would be a fair market value to pay for this car?

How much would it cost to restore it based on this brief overview and is it worth it?

Lastly, does anyone know any good mechanic who knows about Datsun and will assist me in restoring it, if I purchase it? (Los Angeles area)

 

Thanks for the help.

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Well they are very expensive to get, restore, or just keep on the road. Many parts are just unobtainable. Money pit comes to mind. Great little car though. Odometer only goes to 99,999 and rolls over to 00,000..so mileage could be much higher.

 

Pictures?

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Waiting for pictures.

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I also think in California, somebody is responsible for ALL the registration fees that would have been paid as if the car was continuously registered, since the last registration expired.

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How much would it cost to restore it based on this brief overview and is it worth it?

 

A lot, and no. No restoration is really worth it's cost. It never translates into increased value in the car. 

 

For example, say you buy it for $1500. You spend $15-20k restoring it. Now it's worth $10-12k. Always cheaper in the long run to buy a finished car. Only consider a restoration project if you really want to rebuild one yourself. 

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What is your definition of restore? Will every piece of hardware, rubber, wire and metal be either replated,repainted,repaired or replaced? Parts not inculding running gear will easily total around $16,000. Most people will not go the restore route. Its cheaper and maybe more fun to do an resto mod with an SR20/KA. Spend the money on something else....like maybe a 2L if you must have a roadster.

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Hi everyone, I need help in this opportunity I have in buying a 1970 Datsun 1600 Roadster. The car has been sitting in the garage for a long time, without ever turning on. It seems the car does not have the original motor but I could be wrong. Additionally it looks like the top has been modified and does not fit properly. The tags are expired and last registered in Los Angeles, CA. It shows 61,000+ miles on the odometer. Inteior looks decent with some cosmetic damage and possible rust. I don't know anything about this type of car and if its worth restoring it.

 

My questions if you guys could help me with is, based on the pictures and the brief description, what would be a fair market value to pay for this car?

How much would it cost to restore it based on this brief overview and is it worth it?

Lastly, does anyone know any good mechanic who knows about Datsun and will assist me in restoring it, if I purchase it? (Los Angeles area)

 

Thanks for the help.

 

What pictures?

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I love Roadsters. It took decades, but they've grown on me. I'd fix one up if I had the means. For me. Not for the cash. Show us your starting point.

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