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Dime Dave

TC Rods & LCA from FutoFab

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New Product Introduction and Special Offer from FutoFab

www.FutoFab.com

 

FutoFab is becoming known for its fiberglass Datsun 510 parts, but we have not forgotten our fabrication roots, where we started. We are now announcing a new line of parts for the Datsun 510, adjustable tension and control rods and adjustable lower control arms.

 

FutoFab’s adjustable Tension Control Rods use a ball/socket forward pivot with a bellows dust cover. It bolts directly into the forward TC mount on the 510 chassis. A yellow cad plated bracket mounts to the stock lower control arm. The TC Rod’s rear clevis mounts to the bracket using a 3/8” NAS bolt and locking jet nut. Adjustment is done by turning the threaded front ball/socket stud into the aluminum coupler.

 

Link to FutoFab’s Adjustable TC Rod with more detail:

FutoFab Adjustable TC Rod

 

FutoFab’s Adjustable Lower Control Arms for the Datsun 510 will also the B210, 610 & 710. These control arms use an adjuster with right and left threads. By backing off the jamb nuts and turning the adjuster, the length of the LCA can be changed without unbolting it from the car. The design allows use of the original ball joint, sway bar links and pivot hardware.

 

Link to FutoFab’s Adjustable Lower Control Arm with more detail:

FutoFab Adjustable Lower Control Arm

 

As an introductory offer, both adjustable lower control arms and tension control rods are being offered as a package for $395/set + $15 S&H within the continental US. Offer good thru April 30, 2010.

 

These components are direct bolt-on parts, everything needed is included. No need to modify your chassis or source additional parts to make these parts fit. It’s as simple as removing the old and bolting on the new.

 

 

Introductory Offer - FutoFab Adjustable TC Rods & LCA package - $395/set + $15 S&H within the continental US.

Offer good thru April 30, 2010.

lca%20and%20tc%20rods.jpg

 

 

The FutoFab TC Rod sets sell for $205/set + $15 S&H within the continental US.

tc%20rods%20for%20stock%20lca-800%20pix%20wide.jpg

 

 

The FutoFab LCA sets sell for $235/set + $15 S&H within the continental US.

lca%20left%20side%20800%20pixels%20wide.jpg

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Wow Dave,

 

Those look sweet.

 

Thanks for making these and adding more options for us 510 guys.

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If anyone gets a set of these, let me know how they turn out. I'm definitely interested.

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Those are nice. I like the articulation that the clevis allows compared to stock and other T/C rods that are available. My only concern would be the strength of the single bolt, although since it's in double sheer compared to the stock two bolts, perhaps it's equally as strong. Thoughts?

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thisismatt

Posted Today, 04:32 PM

 

Those are nice. I like the articulation that the clevis allows compared to stock and other T/C rods that are available. My only concern would be the strength of the single bolt, although since it's in double sheer compared to the stock two bolts, perhaps it's equally as strong. Thoughts?

thisismatt,

 

We understand your concern. This is a very critical bolted connnection. If threads are positioned at the shear point in a bolted connection it weakens the load capacity of the connection. We use a bolt that has full shank diameter at both shear point within the clevis in this connection.

 

The bolt used in the clevis is an air frame rated 3/8" diameter bolt with a 75,000 PSI shear strength (higher than grade 8). In double shear it will resist over 16,000 lbs before failure. We specifically use air frame rated bolts for their strength at this connection.

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Payment sent! I'll be the gienua pig on these! :unsure:

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I'll be the gienua pig on these! :unsure:

:thumbup:

 

i should have the $$ before canby, will you have em installed by then? :)

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:thumbup:

 

i should have the $$ before canby, will you have em installed by then? :)

 

Probably not. I'm going to be on a ship until the 12th of June. I'll get home in time to pack the car and haul ass to Canby for Sunday! I could bring them with me though for show and tell. :P

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I could bring them with me though for show and tell. :P

 

ooooooooo :D

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ME LIKEY. time to sell off one of my kids for car parts againdevil.png . datto, did you get a full set of LCA's and TC rods? would love to see the fit and finish.

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ME LIKEY. time to sell off one of my kids for car parts againdevil.png . datto, did you get a full set of LCA's and TC rods? would love to see the fit and finish.

 

I just needed the LCAs. I have the T3 TC rods. It will be interesting to see how compatible the two are.

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Kudos to FutoFab on there LCA's and T/C rods! Received my order for the set and the workmanship is excellent!!

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3nickels wrote on 09 April 2010 - 11:36 PM

 

"Kudos to FutoFab on there LCA's and T/C rods! Received my order for the set and the workmanship is excellent!!"

 

 

Thank you for the kind words.

 

Please post some pics when you get them installed.

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thisismatt,

 

We understand your concern. This is a very critical bolted connnection. If threads are positioned at the shear point in a bolted connection it weakens the load capacity of the connection. We use a bolt that has full shank diameter at both shear point within the clevis in this connection.

 

The bolt used in the clevis is an air frame rated 3/8" diameter bolt with a 75,000 PSI shear strength (higher than grade 8). In double shear it will resist over 16,000 lbs before failure. We specifically use air frame rated bolts for their strength at this connection.

 

If anyone is super-concerned, you might want to offer a Titanium bolt. Much higher shear strength than any steel.

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An original 510 TC rod is mounted to the control arm with (2) 10mm bolts in single shear. By using a clevis with a single 3/8" bolt that is mounted in double shear, it gives the same shear strength as using (2) 3/8" bolts in single shear.

 

With AN fasteners, the "grip" length (the unthreaded portion) of the bolt can be properly sized so that the full 3/8" shank diameter is placed in the shear position. If this was a typical SAE Grade 8 bolt the strength would be greatly reduced because the threads, with a reduced cross sectional area, would be placed in the shear position. The true bolt diameter at the threads is about tap drill size, roughly 5/16" diameter on a 3/8" bolt. This is why it is so important to use properly sized AN fasteners in this type of joint.

 

This installation is not an uncommon design. Many, much heavier racecars are fabricated using this type of installation with just one 3/8" diameter bolt. If someone is concerened they could use titanium or simply increase the bolt diameter, but at a 16,000# capacity for this joint, chances are something else has failed well before the bolt will.

 

FYI - (2) 10mm - 8.8 metric bolts in single shear will only resist 12,271#.

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what kind of spherical bearing is that? Is it lined with teflon or kevlar, or is it just metal on metal?

That might be important for guys running it on the street vs track.

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We use oversize, 2 piece, 3/4" steel rod ends at the inner pivot points on the LCA's. These are a standard -12 female rod end.

 

Rod ends with Teflon/Kevlar races are a more precise part with tighter monoball clearances, but they need to operate in a clean environment for durability and do not function well when impact or jarring type loads are present. The jarring type impact loads and the abrasive nature of the dirt and grit that a suspension component is exposed to will more quickly degrade softer race materials like Teflon and Kevlar, prematurely wearing out the rod end.

 

We have found that in the harsh under-chassis environment, the 2 piece steel rod ends are very durable and last quite well. Over time, like any rod end, they will wear. The 2 piece, ¾” steel on steel rod ends will loosen, but I have yet to see one break (edit - from wear that is). I have seen 3 piece rod ends fail with the race actually being deformed and pounded out the side of the rod end from the suspension’s constant jarring and impact loading.

 

Using a more precision part is not always the right choice. The environment that part lives in and how that environment affects function and durability must also be considered.

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You should check out the ones they use for dirt/desert racing. The ones that do have liners inserted do pound out after some harsh driving. But the injected liners are the way to go and are self lubricating. Keeps out the dirt and no need to oil. Just my 2 cents.

 

I'm building a 4 link for my wagon and spent countless hours of research and talking to experienced dirt, track, and desert racers and it seems that the consensus is that the self injected liners are the way to go for street and dirt racing. While the 2 piece ends are cheap and functional for track racing(which they probably change out regularly), the self injected are a little bit more pricey but would pay off in the end(for street that is).

 

Just thought it would be and extra benefit or option to whomever purchases your control arms. BTW: those are some sharp looking arms!

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This is one of the reasons why message boards are so cool. Good ideas can come from places where an individual’s exposure and experiences vary from yours.

 

There not allot of dirt track racing and no off-roading here in the Northeast so the durability of the injection liner process is not well known. Thanks for sharing.

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This is one of the reasons why message boards are so cool. Good ideas can come from places where an individual’s exposure and experiences vary from yours.

 

There not allot of dirt track racing and no off-roading here in the Northeast so the durability of the injection liner process is not well known. Thanks for sharing.

I have buddies who race desert trucks where every joint is a heim or monoball and they rarely get replaced. This is a dry, dusty and dirty environment and we're more often breaking chromo suspension members than wearing anything out. I don't think desert racing or dirt track racing is a very good indicator of joint life, considering the limited overall mileage they're running each year. For instance, they've been running the same setup for over a year and have a 250-500 mile race every two months. That's only 3000 miles a year at the most. For a non-daily driver I really wouldn't worry about joint life, and even then I don't think you'll see nearly the dirt & debris that we get out in the desert. I'm more concerned with overall suspension member strength.

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what kind of spherical bearing is that? Is it lined with teflon or kevlar, or is it just metal on metal?

That might be important for guys running it on the street vs track.

 

Kevlar would be choice regardless of useage...IMO

 

EDIT : i need to learn how to read lol

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